Open Studies

An Open Studies option is available  if you wish to take post-secondary-level credit courses at NorQuest, but are not applying to a specific certificate or diploma program to attain a credential. All Open Studies students must apply and pay a one-time application fee.

Who could be an Open Studies student?

Open Studies may be right for you if you are:

  1. Using Open Studies as a pathway to a credit program:
  • You want to take courses to get a head start on your education.
  • You plan to apply to a NorQuest program and wish to take courses to obtain transfer credit to reduce your course load once you are in the program.
  • You want to study at NorQuest, but are not sure which program to take. You're taking some courses to see what interests you.
  1. A general interest/lifelong learner:
  • You take classes for your own general interest or for personal or professional development.
  • You are not interested in applying to a program or obtaining any kind of credential from NorQuest right now.
  1. A visiting student:
  • You are currently enrolled in a program at another post-secondary institution. You want to take a course at NorQuest because it fits your schedule and/or the course isn't offered at this time by your home institution.

Admission and Prerequisite Criteria

New and former students who intend to take Open Studies courses must first apply and pay a one-time, non-refundable, non-transferable application fee. Former Open Studies students can contact Enrolment at 780.644.6000 or enrolment@norquest.ca to inquire if an application fee is required.

Prerequisites for individual courses will be verified by the Office of the Registrar. To register for an Open Studies course that has prerequisites, you must have your official transcript(s) sent to NorQuest College.

Open Studies students are more likely to be successful if they have an English language proficiency level that is appropriate for the program under which their courses are offered.

General Open Studies Requirements

You may take a maximum of 30 credits in Open Studies before you will be required to submit an application for admission to a desired NorQuest program.

Open Studies courses (noted within the program pages of certificate and diploma programs) are open for registration to Open Studies students on the following dates:

Term Open Studies Registration Date*
Fall August 1
Winter December 1
Spring April 1

*When the first of the month falls on a weekend or holiday, registration will open on the next business day.

  • Transfer credit is not assessed while a learner is enrolled in Open Studies; however, if you apply and are accepted to a NorQuest certificate or diploma program, transfer credit will be assessed upon request.
  • Open studies students may audit courses that are eligible for audit; permission from the Program Chair and/or course instructor is required. All regular audit procedures and financial processes will be followed.
  • All courses are subject to availability and may not all be offered each term.
  • Some sections of a course may be restricted to students enrolled in a specific program.

First-time applicants to Open Studies

You may apply prior to your registration date. This is especially recommended if you plan to register in courses that have prerequisites. However, be aware that space in Open Studies classes is limited:

  • Application fees are non-refundable
  • If you are applying through ApplyAlberta, there is a processing time for applications. Once your application is processed, you will be notified by email about how to register in courses. Be sure to leave yourself enough time to meet registration deadlines for your course.

How to Apply for Open Studies Courses

  1. All Open Studies students must apply for admission online at ApplyAlberta or submit an application to the Office of the Registrar, and pay the one-time application fee.
  2. Once your application has been processed, an email will be sent to your MyMail account with instructions for registering in your courses. Full payment of tuition and fees is due upon registration.
  3. If you intend to take an in-person class, you should register a minimum of five working days prior to the start of any class to ensure that the class is not cancelled due to low enrolment and you are able to access all course materials and resources. If you intend to take an online class with a monthly intake, regular Open Entry/Open Exit (OEE) online registration rules apply (see Registering in Open Entry/Open Exit Online Courses).
  4. If you need to drop an Open Studies course, the standard withdrawal process and schedule applies (see Withdrawal Chart of Academic and Financial Penalties).

Course Listings

Addictions Recovery Practitioner 

CourseTitleCredit
ADRP1011
Examine the relationship between mental health and substance use disorders.  Explore the development in policy, education, awareness, assessment and treatment. Specific issues include the relationship of concurrent disorders to trauma, cultural variations in understanding and responding to mental health and substance use issues, and unique needs of various populations.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
ADRP1013
Explore contributing factors, typical ages of onset, and changes in the prevalence, presentation, course, and assessment and treatment of mental health and substance use disorders across the lifespan. Issues and treatment approaches specific to the various age groups will be examined.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2

University Transfer Courses

CourseTitleCredit
ENGL1011
This course introduces students to formal and rhetorical writing practices at the post-secondary level, with an emphasis on literary analysis and close reading. Instruction and practice will be integrated with the study of literature drawn from a broad range of historical periods, cultural perspectives, social contexts, and literary genres (including fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction articles and essays, news media, and other cultural texts). Specific themes and texts will vary between sections.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in a professional setting. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types of technical communication such as technical descriptions, proposals, reports, web pages, and instructional manuals. Students will also learn how to organize information effectively, write in a clear, concise style, rigorously edit their writing, and format and cite sources using APA style. Effective document design and use of graphic elements are also examined. Students will be required to deliver oral presentations. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2550
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis.The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation.  Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1010
This course explores the development of Canadian political institutions and political issues in Canada.  The student will learn about contemporary Canadian politics by examining the evolution of federalism, the Constitution, parliament, Aboriginal and minority rights, the welfare state, multiculturalism, and similar topics.  The course focuses on teaching critical thinking and writing skills by testing normative and empirical theories against Canadian historical and contemporary evidence.  Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1040
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1050
Build on your introductory knowledge of the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. Focus on the study of cognition (thinking), intelligence and creativity, motivation and emotion, personality, health, stress, and coping, psychological disorders, therapies, and social behaviour. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2010
Study the biological, cognitive, moral, emotional, and social changes that occur in an individual during the human lifespan. Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2450
Acquire an overview of the common psychiatric conditions and their symptoms, causes, and treatment modalities. The role of the mental health worker as part of the multidisciplinary team working with clients with mental health disorders is addressed. You will discuss attitudes, stigma, and the influences of culture. Class readings, web-based learning, group discussions, and assignments help illustrate this material.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI2373
This course examines the experience of dying and death through various socio-cultural contexts. Students will be exposed to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of death and dying.  Questions relating to life and living as well as dying and death will be explored and addressed. The course highlights the importance of paying attention to the experience of dying and death that is common to all species and every culture.  It exposes students to the reality of dying and death that is often denied in North American culture today.  The course also seeks to demystify death by allowing students to see it as a common human experience thereby equipping students with the knowledge and skills necessary to begin to deal with dying, death, bereavement, and grief. Students will focus on the topics of aging, the dying process, death, bereavement, and grief as they relate to individuals and caregivers. Current North American practices regarding death will be explored, as well as cross-cultural interpretations of dying, death, and bereavement. The course also addresses ethical issues related to dying and death in contemporary North American institutions and communities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WMST2010
This course is a critical feminist examination of embodied lives in differing social locations. The course challenges the traditional dichotomies of mind/body, culture/nature, and public/private in the treatment of such topics as the feminization of poverty; sexualities, reproduction, and family life; violence against women; women and religion; masculinities; and culture and body image.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Accounting Technician

CourseTitleCredit
BUSD1001
This course focuses on the principles of effective business communication, both written and spoken. Specific topics include the writing process, improving grammar, writing a research paper, documenting with APA style, and preparing for public speaking. The process of revising and editing is emphasized throughout the course.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1003
This course emphasizes the wide range of mathematical calculations that are commonly used in the business world. Topics include simple interest, compound interest, future and present values, annuities, amortization, and bond valuation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1004
This course provides an introduction to accounting procedures and financial statements and their underlying concepts and principles. Within this framework, accounting practice is integrated with the development of accounting information for effective decision making.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1005
Students will study specific forms of business and employment communication, including business letters and memoranda, resumes, covering letters for job applications and interviewing, formal report writing, graphic design principles, and business meetings.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1006
This course will further examine accounting procedures and their underlying concepts and principles. Students learn about additional standards and problems of valuation, income measurement, and disclosure.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1007
Learn from this practical introduction to software applications most commonly used in business. Develop a basic working knowledge of a suite of business software applications that includes word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and database management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1510
Examine the nature of economic problems and systems in relation to the following: functions of money, commercial and central banking, national income analysis, monetary and fiscal policy, and pricing under competitive and monopolistic conditions. Study selected topics in analysis and policy. Current economic problems are discussed throughout the course.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2003
Building on the theory and skills developed in BUSD 1006, Principles of Accounting, and BUSD 1007, Business Computer Applications, this course explores the software used for financial accounting. Students become familiar with the programs that make up current accounting software packages and their capabilities. Advanced functions of spreadsheets allow students to set up payroll and income tax functions. A review of database management systems will reveal the technology behind the most widely used accounting applications.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2006
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and procedures associated with the Canadian federal income tax system, the structure of the Income Tax Act of Canada, and the application of rules and procedures surrounding the determination of tax liability. Although both individual and corporate taxpayers will be considered, the primary emphasis will be on taxation as related to individuals. Some attention will also be given to the concepts and procedures associated with the federal goods and services tax (GST).
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2015
This introductory course in payroll includes a study of employment standards, designation of individuals as employees or contractors, record-keeping requirements, payroll calculations, taxable and non-taxable benefits, payroll journal entries, reporting requirements, and employee termination.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Administrative Professional

CourseTitleCredit
BUSN1165
Develop your keyboarding technique and enhance your keyboarding skills while increasing your speed and accuracy.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
BUSN1166
Create a variety of professional business documents.  Increase your proficiency and competency by using Word features such as character and paragraph formatting, columns, editing, tables, styles, and mail merge.
  • 50 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
5
BUSN1167
Learn to work with spreadsheets using MS Excel software. Learn how to organize, design, and edit worksheets. Create formulas and functions (statistical, financial, database, and logical) for a variety of business applications and use footers, headers, formatting, and charts. Students must have a minimum grade of C to progress to BUSN 1180.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1171
Develop skills in office procedures and organization. Study office ergonomics and customer service; learn how to process mail; carry out file-management procedures; learn to build travel itineraries, and develop skills in arranging and documenting meetings.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1173
Develop the written and verbal communication skills required of a business professional. In this course, you will examine business writing and develop various letters and memos in a business context. Using critical thinking, you will further practise and perfect your communication skills through critical analysis, persuasive writing, summaries, and oral presentations. APA format is taught and practised throughout the course.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1178
Learn to use the various functions of MS Access. Create queries, tables, forms, reports, and pivot tables. Learn to use MS PowerPoint, and create professional business presentations using the advanced features such as transitions, animations, and master slides. Continue to improve keyboarding speed and accuracy throughout the course.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1179
Develop your employability skills in this course. Learn to prepare a professional resume and handle an interview situation.  Develop work-related skills in team work, conflict management, problem solving and business ethics.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1180
This advanced course builds on the MS Excel course and provides you with the opportunity to enhance your skills and productivity. You will learn to use features such as Macros, Scenarios, PivotTables, and Solver to automate tasks, improve efficiencies, and collect and analyze data. In addition to Excel, you will also learn about MS Outlook. You will learn to send and receive mail, schedule appointments, set up meetings, organize your contacts, and create tasks and notes.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1186
Review and apply math concepts to solve business problems, and learn the basic skills required for financial applications, bookkeeping concepts, and procedures. Learn the basics of how financial transactions are recorded using manual and computerized bookkeeping systems.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1188
Develop skills in business event planning. Learn how to plan, design, implement and minimize the risks in planning a successful business event.  Gain hands-on experience in designing and implementing an actual event.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1193
Build on the skills you learned in Business Communications I. Study specific forms of business and employment communications. Learn to do business research and to document your sources using APA citation style. Learn basic graphic design principles for business communications.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Business Administration

CourseTitleCredit
BUSD1001
This course focuses on the principles of effective business communication, both written and spoken. Specific topics include the writing process, improving grammar, writing a research paper, documenting with APA style, and preparing for public speaking. The process of revising and editing is emphasized throughout the course.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1002
Students examine the interaction between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include the fundamental principles of microeconomics; supply and demand; markets and welfare; government intervention; behaviour of the firm; market organization; and income distribution.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1003
This course emphasizes the wide range of mathematical calculations that are commonly used in the business world. Topics include simple interest, compound interest, future and present values, annuities, amortization, and bond valuation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1004
This course provides an introduction to accounting procedures and financial statements and their underlying concepts and principles. Within this framework, accounting practice is integrated with the development of accounting information for effective decision making.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1005
Students will study specific forms of business and employment communication, including business letters and memoranda, resumes, covering letters for job applications and interviewing, formal report writing, graphic design principles, and business meetings.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1006
This course will further examine accounting procedures and their underlying concepts and principles. Students learn about additional standards and problems of valuation, income measurement, and disclosure.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1007
Learn from this practical introduction to software applications most commonly used in business. Develop a basic working knowledge of a suite of business software applications that includes word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and database management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1008
Students examine how the economy behaves at the aggregate level and how national income is measured and determined. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; measuring gross domestic product, inflation, and unemployment; demand including the multiplier process; supply, business cycles, and long-term growth; money, banking, and monetary policy; inflation; interest rates; stagflation; deficits and fiscal policy; exchange rates and balance of payments; exchange rate policy; purchasing power, and interest-rate parity.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1009
This course provides a high-level overview of the functions and responsibilities performed by human resource professionals in contemporary businesses. Topics include job analysis and design, recruitment and selection, legal aspects of HR, training and development, HR planning, performance appraisals, compensation and benefits, occupational health and safety and employee relations. A brief introduction to the Alberta Employment Standards Code is also included.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1380
The organization of human productive energy is the central focus of this introductory course. Themes include balancing tasks, relationship requirements, and the needs of the organization with those of the individual. Specific topics include perception, personality, values, attitudes, motivation, group behaviour, and teamwork.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2001
This course examines financial accounting topics in-depth. It explores recent developments in accounting valuation and income determination and the related disclosure practices and reporting procedures recommended by professional accounting associations and applied in business today. The primary focus is on a comprehensive treatment of assets and liabilities. Special topics are introduced where appropriate.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2002
This course is the first of a two-part, in-depth study that examines the concepts of cost and managerial accounting. Major topics include cost-volume profit-analysis, relevant costs and short-term decision making, responsibility accounting, standard costing and variance analysis, and product costing and cost flow.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2003
Building on the theory and skills developed in BUSD 1006, Principles of Accounting, and BUSD 1007, Business Computer Applications, this course explores the software used for financial accounting. Students become familiar with the programs that make up current accounting software packages and their capabilities. Advanced functions of spreadsheets allow students to set up payroll and income tax functions. A review of database management systems will reveal the technology behind the most widely used accounting applications.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2004
This course continues the in-depth examination of financial accounting topics begun in BUSD 2001, Intermediate Accounting I. Emphasis is placed on accounting valuation, income determination, and the related disclosure practices and reporting procedures required in Canada today. The focus is on capitalization of Canadian corporations and the individual accounting and reporting problems associated with corporate income taxes, pensions, leases, and the Statement of Changes in Financial Position.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2005
This course is the second of a two-part, in-depth study that examines the concepts of cost/managerial accounting. Major topics include pricing decisions, product profitability, cost management, the balanced scorecard, cost allocation, joint products and byproducts, sales variances, customer profitability, spoilage scrap and rework, capital budgeting, management control systems, and performance measurement.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2006
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and procedures associated with the Canadian federal income tax system, the structure of the Income Tax Act of Canada, and the application of rules and procedures surrounding the determination of tax liability. Although both individual and corporate taxpayers will be considered, the primary emphasis will be on taxation as related to individuals. Some attention will also be given to the concepts and procedures associated with the federal goods and services tax (GST).
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2007
This course focuses on methods of locating qualified candidates, employing appropriate recruitment channels, and improving the overall efficiency of the recruitment process. Competencies are built by examining such aspects as an aging workforce, increased competition for available labour, dynamic environmental conditions, and the demand for qualified candidates. Students also learn about the implications of selecting inappropriate candidates and why this can be a costly and time-consuming proposition
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2008
Through case analysis and assignments, students learn to make strategic marketing decisions relating to product, pricing, supply and distribution, and integrated marketing communications.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2009
This course addresses important cross-cultural aspects of leadership and related subjects such as diversity management, teamwork, decision making, and negotiations. Drawing from "real-life" work situations and challenges, participants will be exposed to case studies and small-group activities designed to articulate and reconcile cross-cultural business/organizational dilemmas.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2011
Students learn the foundation and guidelines for an effective process of employee recruitment, evaluation, and compensation. This course explores competency assessments, performance reviews, individual career planning, monetary and non-monetary benefits, and ongoing feedback to ensure that the HR plan is competitive and fair. Students will demonstrate the use of a number of tools used by the human resource department, suggest different methods and approaches to improve performance in an organization, and identify issues of concern to a company and recommend methods to improve results.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2012
This course provides a broad introduction to the body of law governing the employment relationship. The emphasis is primarily on employment law in Canada, with selected references to practices in other jurisdictions. The learner will become familiar with specific areas of law and will apply concepts and terminology to solve problems related to effective human resource management. Additional topics include collective bargaining, grievance and arbitration processes, labour–management collaboration, and the nonunion workplace.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2013
In the 21st century, organizations and workplaces experience constant change. Change in leadership, organizational structure, operational systems, and business culture all impact individuals and business outcomes. This course focuses on the people involved in and impacted by change. Students learn organizational change strategies through a number of different frameworks, examine interventions for different levels of the organization, and acquire the tools to effectively manage the change process.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2014
This course introduces employee benefits planning and administration from a total compensation perspective. Students review various benefit plans including those with health, disability, insurance, retirement, paid time off, and work schedule benefits. The course also explores new developments in the field of employee benefits, specifically emerging benefit plans and contemporary issues such as flexible benefits plans, demographic changes, part-time workers, and legislative initiatives. Additional topics include wage and salary administration techniques, including job analysis, job evaluation, and compensation surveys.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2015
This introductory course in payroll includes a study of employment standards, designation of individuals as employees or contractors, record-keeping requirements, payroll calculations, taxable and non-taxable benefits, payroll journal entries, reporting requirements, and employee termination.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2016
Students learn the valuable skill of preparing for negotiations and assessing alternatives. Through the study of theory and application of techniques in role-playing exercises, students will build on the ability to negotiate. Negotiation skills are essential in daily interactions with others. The focus of the course will be how to change an uncertain situation into a manageable relationship. Students will also be introduced to the steps of the bargaining and collaborative process as well as the approach to interpersonal and labour-related negotiations.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2017
This course provides an overview of the role of training and development in human resource management. Key elements covered include analyzing the training needs of an organization; program design, development, and delivery; and program evaluation. Other topics include adult learning theory, career planning, counselling, training techniques, sources of training, budgeting, and trends in training. Students will learn to assess the value of employee training in relation to the prospective of the organization.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2018
Students will explore the impact of business decisions on social and environmental issues relevant to real-life work situations, with an emphasis on the kinds of problems most students will encounter as decision makers. Students will interpret ethical concepts that are relevant to resolving ethical dilemmas, and formulate the moral reasoning and analytical skills needed to resolve ethical dilemmas.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2019
This course deals with the art of strategy: how to identify and choose a superior competitive position, how to analyze a strategic situation, and finally how to create the organizational context to make the chosen strategy work. Students will learn to explore conceptual frameworks and models that will assist them in analyzing competitive situations and strategic dilemmas while gaining insight into strategic management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2021
Students will learn how retailing has developed, how retail outlets operate, and how retailers apply retail sales management techniques. Students will also consider factors that affect retailing: globalization, the impact of changing technology, and social and ethical issues. Additional topics include retail planning and supply, location, demand-driven supply, distribution channels, and delivering customer value.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2022
This course focuses on putting the student in the position of an entrepreneur with a new idea and teaches the student how to build that idea into a business case. This course covers the basics of starting a business, from idea assessment to insurance, in a step-by-step manner. Students will learn to identify the strategic options facing a growing business, as well as a range of practical solutions.  Topics will include all aspects of managing, marketing, operating, and administering the venture during this critical stage.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2023
Students take an in-depth look at social and digital media communication technologies from the perspective of a small-to-medium-sized enterprise (SME). Students learn the potential impact of these technologies and how they can be used to build long-term customer relationships by allowing their customers to connect, collaborate, and then share ideas and information. Through a practical approach, students learn about social and digital media trends and technology, return on investment (ROI) of social media strategies, social media best practices, web analytics, search engine optimization (SEO), blogging, podcasting, mobile marketing, and web-based advertising strategies. Students design, develop, and present an integrated social and digital media strategy for an SME.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2024
Topics include processes that are used for all types of work, including new product development, and production and delivery of goods and services. This course will provide students with a set of tools that they can use to improve work processes. Students will learn to conduct systematic root-cause analysis to discover process improvements aimed at making processes more cost-effective, dependable, responsive, and flexible. Students will also be introduced to techniques for setting organizational objectives and priorities for process improvement initiatives such as Six Sigma and Lean Management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2025
This course focuses on the principles and practices of logistics. Students explore the emergence of logistics as a major component of corporate success and develop a clear understanding of the intricacies of various logistics systems and the interrelationships among them. The emerging importance of logistics in both the public and private sectors is also studied.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2026
This course explores the fundamental concepts of Lean Manufacturing and the tools and techniques used to analyze and measure work systems. Students learn about several techniques that can bring about improvements in organizational productivity and the reduction of waste. As well, the basics of time study, work sampling, and the learning curve are investigated. Video resources are used throughout the course to illustrate concepts in manufacturing and service environments.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2027
Under the influence of global markets and international competition, the quality of products has acquired a totally new level of significance as a business strategy for operational survival. Students will be well prepared to implement a cost-effective quality management system, with its technical, legal, and human aspects, in any organization.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2030
Examine the objectives of financial management and the related role and responsibilities of the financial manager. The approach is practical in nature with references to the development of theories in finance. Using a corporate framework, explore the various sources of funds for a firm.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2190
The solution to marketing problems rests in sound analysis of consumer behaviour. Using the case method, you will find a practical outlet for quantitative and qualitative consumer analysis tools. Cases will explore both goods and services marketing in both industrial and consumer environments.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2230
Study the objectives of financial management and the related role and responsibilities of the financial manager. The approach is practical in nature with references to the development of theories in finance. The various applications of funds by the firm are explored in this sequential course using a corporate framework.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2620
Learn how to develop computer-based accounting information systems, and how such information systems support decision making at all levels of management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD3010
Gain a general overview of the Canadian legal system, with emphasis on underlying considerations of social policy. Analyze selected topics from the fields of tort and contract, while considering the nature, sources, philosophy, and policy objectives of the law.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Community Support Worker

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1011
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others. Learn theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict, and conflict management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1024
Create accurate and appropriate documentation and records and learn to prepare reports using the documentation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Early Learning and Child Care

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1007
This course focuses on the development and practice of writing skills and forms of written communication required for success in educational and human services settings. Topics include an overview of the writing process, using correct grammar, developing writing strategies, writing essays, writing for business, and proofreading.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1008
Effective communication, including mindful listening, conflict resolution, non-verbal communication, managing emotions, and perception checking are critical for successful interpersonal relationships. This course will assist students to develop the strategies they need to communicate with others accurately and effectively, whether the relationships with others exist in a work place, a family, a friendship, or a classroom.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1003
This course provides learners with the skills they need to create the documents, spreadsheets, and presentations needed in college human services programs and employment in human services.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1000
This course focuses on the development of children from conception to twelve years of age, including the physical child, the thinking child, the social child, and the whole child, as well as introducing atypical development. Students will study key theories and theorists in child development.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1002
This survey course focuses on understanding the goals and essential components of developing successful early childhood programs. By studying the role of early childhood professionals, students will gain insight into their own philosophy of early childhood education.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1006
Students will develop an understanding of the role of play in a child’s growth and learning. They will also learn about the role of the environment and the early childhood practitioner in enhancing children’s play. This course focuses on the planning of inclusive and appropriate play environments, including indoor and outdoor play experiences. Students will explore a variety of play situations and materials used in child-care settings.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1007
This introductory course will provide students with an understanding of early literacy. Students will learn strategies that can be used to develop a child's interest and skills related to listening, speaking, reading, and writing that form the foundation of a language arts curriculum. Students will also explore the effective use of children's literature, storytelling, puppetry, and dramatic play and the importance of cultural considerations and individual differences.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1008
This introductory course provides an understanding of children's behaviour in a developmental context, and the importance of realistic expectations of children in various stages. The social development of the young child will be examined in the context of positive guidance to support self-regulation. Appropriate strategies to help children to develop positive self-esteem and develop appropriate behaviour will be discussed. The prevention of behaviour problems through developmentally appropriate practices and interventions will be emphasized.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Hospital Unit Clerk

CourseTitleCredit
BUSN1152
Study the language of medical terminology. Learn how to read and interpret commonly used medical terms, symbols, and abbreviations. Develop your understanding of rules, prefixes, suffixes, roots, combining forms, body systems, diagnostics, and drug classifications. Achieve fluency through practice sessions, quizzes, and exercises. Minimum pass mark of B- required to progress to BUSN 1154
  • 60 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
6
BUSN1156
This course examines communication: what goes well, what goes wrong and, most importantly, why!  Students explore how background, experience, and beliefs shape the way individuals communicate and how to adapt to changing conditions, people, and situations.  Students also explore how to use problem solving and critical-thinking skills to resolve conflict within a team setting.  Finally, students focus on how to communicate in writing, including writing business letters, emails, resumes, and cover letters.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1165
Develop your keyboarding technique and enhance your keyboarding skills while increasing your speed and accuracy.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
BUSN1194
Practise intermediate computer skills in MS Windows using MS Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint, as well as commonly used Internet browsers. Learn how to apply these skills in a health-care setting with workplace-relevant exercises and assignments.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
5

Medical Device Reprocessing Technician

Business Communications Skills for Health-Care Professionals (BUSN1156)

Pharmacy Technician

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1000
Study the basics of normal anatomy and physiology. The structure and function of each body system is covered, and the relationship between the structure and function of each system is explored. Learn about the interactions of body systems.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1011
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others. Learn theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict, and conflict management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in a professional setting. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types of technical communication such as technical descriptions, proposals, reports, web pages, and instructional manuals. Students will also learn how to organize information effectively, write in a clear, concise style, rigorously edit their writing, and format and cite sources using APA style. Effective document design and use of graphic elements are also examined. Students will be required to deliver oral presentations. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1010
This course focuses on the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders. It gives learners a foundation for understanding the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan. The course includes common disease entities as examples of pathological processes. Each pathological process is explained as a concept and illustrated by typical diseases and disorders. Disease is discussed in terms of manifestations, etiology, and complications. Learners will gain a basic understanding of the diagnosis and management of the disease process associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PHRM1001
Learn the application of arithmetic to pharmacy calculations.  Examine units of measurement, pharmacy math, prescription pricing, calculation of medication doses, and those calculations used in the preparation of extemporaneous compounds and parenteral products.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PHRM1002
Examine the laws and ethics that govern health care, pharmacy practice, and the profession of pharmacy technician in Alberta. Learn the value of professionalism, the Code of Ethics, and the concept of self-regulated professions. Students will differentiate between personal and professional values and principles.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

*Note: Pharmaceutical Calculations (PHRM1001) and Pharmacy Law and Ethics (PHRM1002) are open ONLY to current practising pharmacists who wish to refresh their skills.

Physical Therapy Assistant

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1000
Study the basics of normal anatomy and physiology. The structure and function of each body system is covered, and the relationship between the structure and function of each system is explored. Learn about the interactions of body systems.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1011
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others. Learn theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict, and conflict management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM2011
Explore the importance of communication skills in developing caring relationships with clients and working effectively within the health-care team. Learn to vary your communication techniques and methods in different situations. Explore various concepts and principles of therapeutic communication and consider their implications for professional practice. Transfer: AU
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in a professional setting. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types of technical communication such as technical descriptions, proposals, reports, web pages, and instructional manuals. Students will also learn how to organize information effectively, write in a clear, concise style, rigorously edit their writing, and format and cite sources using APA style. Effective document design and use of graphic elements are also examined. Students will be required to deliver oral presentations. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1010
This course focuses on the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders. It gives learners a foundation for understanding the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan. The course includes common disease entities as examples of pathological processes. Each pathological process is explained as a concept and illustrated by typical diseases and disorders. Disease is discussed in terms of manifestations, etiology, and complications. Learners will gain a basic understanding of the diagnosis and management of the disease process associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
RHAB1001
Learn the fundamental concepts and theories specific to rehabilitation and gain an introduction to the field of rehabilitation medicine. Examine the common practices and unique roles of physical therapy, therapeutic recreation, and occupational therapy, and explore the skills, roles, and traits of the therapy assistant.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Practical Nurse

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1001
Study the organization of the human body and the structures and functions of the body systems that provide support and movement, coordination, and regulation. Learn how body systems work together to maintain homeostasis. Terminology used by health professionals will be introduced. In the Practical Nurse program, a final mark of C- is required to progress to PATH 1000.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ANPH1002
Study the organization of the human body and the structures and functions of the body systems that provide transport and protection; absorption, diffusion, and excretion; and reproduction. Learn how body systems work together to maintain homeostasis. Terminology used by health professionals and theory and principles related to microbiology will be introduced. In the Practical Nurse program, a final mark of C- is required to progress to PATH 1000.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2550
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis.The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation.  Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1000
Learn the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan. Each pathological process is explained as a concept, and examined through examples of typical diseases and disorders. Gain a basic understanding of the diagnosis and management of the disease process associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Social Work

CourseTitleCredit
ENGL1011
This course introduces students to formal and rhetorical writing practices at the post-secondary level, with an emphasis on literary analysis and close reading. Instruction and practice will be integrated with the study of literature drawn from a broad range of historical periods, cultural perspectives, social contexts, and literary genres (including fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction articles and essays, news media, and other cultural texts). Specific themes and texts will vary between sections.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in a professional setting. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types of technical communication such as technical descriptions, proposals, reports, web pages, and instructional manuals. Students will also learn how to organize information effectively, write in a clear, concise style, rigorously edit their writing, and format and cite sources using APA style. Effective document design and use of graphic elements are also examined. Students will be required to deliver oral presentations. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1010
This course explores the development of Canadian political institutions and political issues in Canada.  The student will learn about contemporary Canadian politics by examining the evolution of federalism, the Constitution, parliament, Aboriginal and minority rights, the welfare state, multiculturalism, and similar topics.  The course focuses on teaching critical thinking and writing skills by testing normative and empirical theories against Canadian historical and contemporary evidence.  Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1040
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1050
Build on your introductory knowledge of the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. Focus on the study of cognition (thinking), intelligence and creativity, motivation and emotion, personality, health, stress, and coping, psychological disorders, therapies, and social behaviour. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2010
Study the biological, cognitive, moral, emotional, and social changes that occur in an individual during the human lifespan. Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOWK1010
Study the history of social work and its evolution as a profession as the foundation for understanding social work’s current roles and practices. Learn about social policy, political structures, social issues, and practice with diverse client groups.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Therapeutic Recreation

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1000
Study the basics of normal anatomy and physiology. The structure and function of each body system is covered, and the relationship between the structure and function of each system is explored. Learn about the interactions of body systems.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1011
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others. Learn theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict, and conflict management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM2011
Explore the importance of communication skills in developing caring relationships with clients and working effectively within the health-care team. Learn to vary your communication techniques and methods in different situations. Explore various concepts and principles of therapeutic communication and consider their implications for professional practice. Transfer: AU
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DEMC1011
This is a creative and dynamic approach to dementia care that is suitable for caregivers, both formal and informal, in a variety of care settings. Comprehensive information about dementia from diagnosis to end stage is discussed in a practical and interactive manner.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in a professional setting. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types of technical communication such as technical descriptions, proposals, reports, web pages, and instructional manuals. Students will also learn how to organize information effectively, write in a clear, concise style, rigorously edit their writing, and format and cite sources using APA style. Effective document design and use of graphic elements are also examined. Students will be required to deliver oral presentations. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1010
This course focuses on the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders. It gives learners a foundation for understanding the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan. The course includes common disease entities as examples of pathological processes. Each pathological process is explained as a concept and illustrated by typical diseases and disorders. Disease is discussed in terms of manifestations, etiology, and complications. Learners will gain a basic understanding of the diagnosis and management of the disease process associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
RHAB1001
Learn the fundamental concepts and theories specific to rehabilitation and gain an introduction to the field of rehabilitation medicine. Examine the common practices and unique roles of physical therapy, therapeutic recreation, and occupational therapy, and explore the skills, roles, and traits of the therapy assistant.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WELL1000
Further your understanding of the field of therapeutic recreation and learn about the models of care in the therapeutic recreation process that guide service delivery. Discuss the Leisure Ability Model as a framework to service, with a focus on promoting a client’s wellness through goal-oriented leisure activities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3