PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

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QUICK FACTS

Program length  

4 or 5 terms

Credential

Diploma

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TUITION & FEES


Canadian
Total: $15,862.40

International
Total: $37,528.00

 
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ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

  • Language Arts - this requirement can be met with any of the following, or an equivalent course:
    • 65% in English Language Arts 30-1
    • 65% in ESLG 1860
  • Mathematics - this requirement can be met with any of the following, or an equivalent course:
    • 65% in Mathematics 30-1
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Course Listing

You must complete 25 courses to graduate. Courses are listed below by term to show the recommended path to completing the program in two years as a full-time student.
Course CodeTitleCredit
Term 1 - 16 weeks
ENRG1001 (O)
An introduction to energy and its relationship to climate change, this course will introduce the forms of energy and explain how they are harnessed for our use. Using concepts from math, physics, and chemistry, students will analyze energy use. This course will introduce the concept of energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) management and identify the types of jobs and roles that do this kind of work. Different financial mechanisms intended to mitigate climate change will be evaluated, and the impact of GHG on industry and commercial projects will be assessed. Student will learn to calculate their own, as well as corporate, GHG emissions.
  • 35 Lecture
  • 10 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1002 (O)
This course will explain how utility systems work. Natural gas, traditional, and alternative electricity generation, transmission, distribution, retail, and billing will be explored. Students will examine the complexities of renewable energy procurement. Metering and submetering at the client end will be addressed. Non-energy utility systems such as water will be reviewed as well. Students will examine different utility bills to better understand details often misunderstood in billing. The history of the utility system in Canada and Alberta will be explained to provide context for the setup of today's system. Students will look at how rates are set, how the power pool works, and how energy efficiency is integrated into the system. They will explore the roles of the Alberta Utilities Commission, the Alberta Energy Systems Operator, and Energy Alberta. Non-traditional utilities such as district energy will also be assessed.
  • 40 Lecture
  • 5 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1003 (O)
In this course, students will assess energy- and water-consuming systems and how energy flows through those systems. High-level societal energy systems such as transportation and water will be discussed. Students will then identify traditional building systems used in residential, commercial, and industrial settings. For each of these systems, students will examine how it works, calculate the energy and water consumption of the system, identify advantages and disadvantages of the system, evaluate the life cycle of system-specific equipment, identify energy conservation measures (ECMs) for the system, identify how existing and emerging technology impacts the system, identify maintenance requirements, and discuss how the equipment works as part of the larger system. Systems that will be assessed include building envelopes, heating systems, HVAC, lighting, plug loads and electrical systems, water-using systems, controls and automation, and industrial systems.
  • 39 Lecture
  • 6 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
BUSN1167 (O)
Become familiar with MS Excel and MS Outlook. Learn how to design, organize, and edit MS Excel spreadsheets. You will create formulas and functions (statistical, financial, database, and logical) for a variety of business applications and use footers, headers, formatting, and charts. Using MS Outlook, you will learn to send and receive mail, schedule appointments, set up meetings, organize contacts, and create tasks and notes.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
STAT1151 (O)
Students will learn the basic principles of statistics, acquire the skills to solve elementary statistical and probability problems, and gain hands-on experience with well-known statistical software, as well as basic methods for collecting data. Students will also learn the main tools of descriptive statistics to visualize collected data, analyze data distributions, and establish correlations and regressions between random variables. The course will also cover the main tools of inferential statistics for estimating mean values and proportions by confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, and one-way ANOVA. Applications are taken from wide range of subject areas such as biology and environmental science, business and economics, health sciences, education, crime and law, politics, social studies, and sports and entertainment.  Pre-requisite: Mathematics 30-1 or 30-2
  • 45 Lecture
  • 18 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENGL2510 (O)
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 2 - 16 weeks
ENRG1004
This course examines aspects of operations of facilities and organizations that can be managed to reduce energy and water waste and emissions. The role of technology in direct digital controls systems for building and process operations will be explored. Tools and programs to support operations improvements will be evaluated. Students will become familiar with building automation systems (BAS) and advanced analytics tools for use in maintenance, continuous optimization, and recommissioning.
  • 39 Lecture
  • 6 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1006 (O)
This course will explore how energy modelling is used in industry for forecasting and understanding buildings and new construction. Students will develop models for forecasting energy use and use them to compare predicted use with actual use. Industry best practices for monitoring and verifying projects will be examined. Students will identify ways that they can interact with recommissioning and commissioning agents to improve operational efficiency.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1013 (O)
In this course, students will use financial modelling and tools to justify energy projects. Concepts such as the time value of money, internal rate of return, net present value, and simple payback will be used to help complete lifecycle costing. Students will explore the social cost of carbon and how to use it in business case development. Forecasting will be used for strategic planning and goalsetting with regard to emissions reduction. Students will use industry best practices to estimate utility costs and identify variables to be considered in load forecasting. Using forecasting, risk assessment, other decision-making criteria, and lifecycle analysis, students will develop a business case for a specific energy project. Energy project funding mechanisms such as Property Assessed Clean Energy, revolving funds, and energy service corporations will be evaluated. Students will determine which project conditions lend themselves to specific types of funding.
  • 35 Lecture
  • 10 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENVI2400 (O)
Students will learn the basic principles of environmental physics. Students will build, analyze, and critique physical models of environmental processes. They will apply environmental physics concepts to topical problems such as consumer energy use, renewable energy resources, carbon footprint, water use, waste, and global warming.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENVI2401 (O)
Students will conduct laboratory investigations related to environmental physics concepts such as energy use, electrical power generation, and fluid statics and dynamics. Students will use computers to obtain and analyze data, and to write reports.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
1
EASC1002 (O)
This course is an introduction to earth sciences and physical geography. Topics explored will include the four major earth systems—atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water), geosphere (earth), and biosphere (life)—and how these systems relate to human populations. Students will also explore how earth scientists conduct research, including types of analysis and technologies used in the field. There will be a special focus on the circulation of water and the atmosphere, and how these processes drive the distribution of life on the planet and shape the landscape we see. The course will also discuss many of the current issues surrounding human-environment interactions, including, but not limited to, climate change, erosion, natural disasters, air and water pollution, and freshwater resources.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 3 - 16 weeks
ENRG1005 (O)
This course will familiarize students with the industry standard energy, waste, and water auditing process for commercial, industrial, and residential applications. Students will be able to gather related materials for the audit and evaluate audits prepared by consultants to assess quality. Students will use benchmarking methods and will be able to assess energy conservation measures (ECMs) recommended by auditors for feasibility. Local industrial solutions will be explored as well.
  • 25 Lecture
  • 20 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1007 (O)
Students will explore industry best practice for project management in a case study of an energy retrofit project. This will include business case development, risk assessment, pitching a project, project charter development, project schedule development, introduction to contracts, and how to track and measure project progress for successful completion.
  • 35 Lecture
  • 10 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1009 (O)
This course explores change management theory and organizational conditions that help and hinder change. Students will use behaviour change techniques to develop a change management program for an energy or emissions reduction project. When developing the behaviour change program, students will frame communications for the correct audience. Industry best practices for determining the success of change management programs will be analyzed.
  • 35 Lecture
  • 10 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1016 (O)
In this course, students will critically assess the use of alternative energy systems for different applications. Issues such as policy and technical limitations will be explored to justify choices. Grid technology, including microgrids, will be examined. Students will study the technical impacts on the grid by advanced technology such as electric vehicles, energy storage, and microgeneration. State-of-the-art grid, storage, and alternative technologies will be explored.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
2
ENRG1010
Public policy directly impacts the energy industry. In this course, students will combine general policy development theory with actual municipal, provincial, federal, and global policy. Students will examine policy change over time, the impact that political agendas have on policy, and how change is implemented. They will also explore the role of organizations in larger-scale policy and change. The specific impact of policy on the energy industry will be discussed.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
2
ENVI1121 (O)
Students will learn to identify the basic scientific and social principles that underlie current major environmental issues. Students will also examine local and global case studies and will study the effects of pollution and resource degradation on society.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
BUSD1011
Use your skills and abilities to choose a career and build self-confidence as you enter the work force or pursue further training.  Learn to research the job market and identify the skills required for a new occupation. Get prepared with interview skills and resume writing along with time-management techniques.  Communicating directly and effectively will be practiced.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
1
Term 4 - 16 weeks
ENRG1011 (O)
Regulations, codes, and standards can set a baseline for building performance and help elevate it to new levels. In this course, students will explore the impact of historical codes on our existing infrastructure and deduce the challenges that they have caused. Students will identify current codes, regulations, and standards such as Step Code and electrical standards that have been developed by different levels of government and explore how they impact current buildings. Students will also compare standards in different jurisdictions to explore how they impact emissions. Certification standard programs such as LEED, WELL Buildings, BOMA Best will be broken down in detail. The impact of regulation on the energy industry will also be explored.
  • 39 Lecture
  • 6 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1012
New infrastructure and buildings are constantly under development. Students will compare industry standards and high-performance construction in order to understand best practice. The use of energy modelling in new construction will be examined. Students will explore the modelling to operations pathway for high-performance construction using techniques such as integrated design. Standards that are used for new construction projects will be assessed. Students will examine the steps of high-performance residential new construction and note how policy and standards impact the quality of this type of construction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1014 (O)
Contracts are ubiquitous in the energy industry. Students will identify the types of contracts they may be expected to negotiate and execute, and specific focus will be given to contracts that arise in the project management process and energy procurement agreements. Project-specific contract details such as industry cost thresholds, Request for Proposal (RFP) processes, and contract execution will be covered. Students will explore ways to manage risks in the contract development and execution process, and negotiation theory and techniques will be applied to energy industry contract development. Students will learn how contracts can be executed effectively by being built in to the project management process.
  • 25 Lecture
  • 5 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
2
ENRG1008 (O)
After identifying the different requirements for energy and emissions plans in industry, students will advocate for a specific plan development. They will examine the relationship between goals, policy, strategic plans, and procedures. As well, students will explore different tools and support mechanisms for developing plans, including templates, incentive programs, and training and support. Students will evaluate a data-driven strategic plan, then work with stakeholders to develop and deliver a policy brief. The impact of this strategic plan on other planning completed by the organization will be examined.
  • 33 Lecture
  • 12 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENRG1015 (O)
This course looks at climate change adaptation and its alignment with mitigation efforts. The impact of policy on adaptation will be explored, and students will examine de-carbonization and its impact on adaptation planning. Resilience and opportunities will also be explored in the context of changing ecosystems and climate change with a focus on energy systems resiliency.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
1
ENRG1017 (O)
This course will explore the qualities that make an organization sustainable, how those qualities interact, and the employee’s role in cultivating sustainability. There are three main constituents of any organization: economic feasibility, cultural and social harmony, and environmental neutrality. The interrelationship of these components is the foundation of a sustainable organization. Students will learn to apply continuous improvement tools and methodologies to identify and remove obstacles to meeting sustainability goals.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 5 (Optional) - 16 weeks
COOP2150
Students will integrate academic knowledge with a full-time, paid work experience in a program-related position with an employer organization. They will acquire a level of competence through relevant experience while completing a 16-week work term. This work term will be monitored by Work Integrated Learning. Students will analyze the significance of the application of new skills in their work, and examine their working relationships as well as those of the organization. They will also further define their interest in and attitude toward their field of study. Contact WILCEC@norquest.ca for permission to enroll.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 600 Other
9

Additional note

Courses marked with (O) are available through Open Studies.

COOP2150 is optional and not required to graduate.

Credits required for full-time status: 9 credits per term