Open Studies

An Open Studies option is available if you wish to take post-secondary-level credit courses at NorQuest, but are not applying to a specific certificate or diploma program to attain a credential. All Open Studies students must apply and pay a one-time application fee.

Who could be an Open Studies student?

Open Studies may be right for you if you are:

  • using Open Studies as a pathway to a credit program:
    • You want to take courses to get a head start on your education.
    • You plan to apply to a NorQuest program and wish to take courses to obtain transfer credit to reduce your course load once you are in the program.
    • You want to study at NorQuest, but are not sure which program to take. You're taking some courses to see what interests you.
  • a general interest/lifelong learner:
    • You take classes for your own general interest or for personal or professional development.
    • You are not interested in applying to a program or obtaining any kind of credential from NorQuest right now.
  • a visiting student:
    • You are currently enrolled in a program at another post-secondary institution. You want to take a course at NorQuest because it fits your schedule and/or the course isn't offered at this time by your home institution.

Admission and Prerequisite Criteria

New and former students who intend to take Open Studies courses must first apply at ApplyAlberta and pay a one-time, non-refundable, non-transferable application fee. Former Open Studies students can contact Enrolment at 780.644.6000 or enrolment@norquest.ca to inquire if an application fee is required.

Prerequisites for individual courses will be verified by the Office of the Registrar. To register for an Open Studies course that has prerequisites, you must have your official transcript(s) sent to NorQuest College.

Open Studies students are more likely to be successful if they have an English language proficiency level that is appropriate for the program under which their courses are offered.

General Open Studies Requirements

You may take a maximum of 30 credits in Open Studies before you will be required to submit an application for admission to a desired NorQuest program.

Open Studies courses (noted on the program pages) are available for registration to Open Studies students on the following dates:

Term Open Studies Registration Date*
Fall August 1
Winter December 1
Spring April 1

* When the first of the month falls on a weekend or holiday, registration will open on the next business day.

  • In-person applications are not accepted for Open Studies. Apply early at ApplyAlberta to ensure eligibility to enroll on the Open Studies registration date.
  • Transfer credit is not assessed while a learner is enrolled in Open Studies; however, if you apply and are accepted to a NorQuest certificate or diploma program, transfer credit will be assessed upon request.
  • Open Studies students may audit courses; permission from the program chair and/or course instructor is required. All regular audit procedures and financial processes will be followed.
  • All courses are subject to availability and may not all be offered each term.
  • Some sections of a course may be restricted to students enrolled in a specific program.

First-time applicants to Open Studies

You must apply to Open Studies prior to your registration date. Space in Open Studies classes is limited. Register early for the best opportunity to select the classes you want.

  • Application fees are non-refundable.
  • There is a processing time for applications. Once your application is processed, you will be notified by email about how to register in courses online through MyQuest. Be sure to leave yourself enough time to meet registration deadlines for your course.

How to Register in Open Studies Courses

  1. Open Studies students must first apply for admission online at ApplyAlberta.
  2. Once your application has been processed, an email will be sent to your MyMail account with instructions for registering in your courses. Full payment of tuition and fees is due within 24 hours of registration. Visit norquest.ca/pay for options to pay your tuition and fees.
  3. If you intend to take an in-person class, you should register a minimum of five working days prior to the start of any class to ensure you are able to access all course materials and resources. If you intend to take an online class with a monthly intake, regular Open Entry/Open Exit online registration rules apply. See Registering in Open Entry/Open Exit Online Courses.
  4. If you need to drop an Open Studies course, the standard withdrawal process and schedule applies. SeeWithdrawal Chart of Academic and Financial Penalties.

Course Listings

Accounting Technician

CourseTitleCredit
BUSD1001
This course focuses on the principles of effective business communication, both written and spoken. Specific topics include the writing process, improving grammar, writing a research paper, documenting with APA style, and preparing for public speaking. The process of revising and editing is emphasized throughout the course.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1002
Students examine the interaction between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include the fundamental principles of microeconomics; supply and demand; markets and welfare; government intervention; behaviour of the firm; market organization; and income distribution.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1003
This course emphasizes the wide range of mathematical calculations that are commonly used in the business world. Topics include simple interest, compound interest, future and present values, annuities, amortization, and bond valuation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1004
This course provides an introduction to accounting procedures and financial statements and their underlying concepts and principles. Within this framework, accounting practice is integrated with the development of accounting information for effective decision making.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1005
Students will study specific forms of business and employment communication, including business letters and memoranda, resumes, covering letters for job applications and interviewing, formal report writing, graphic design principles, and business meetings.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1006
This course will further examine accounting procedures and their underlying concepts and principles. Students learn about additional standards and problems of valuation, income measurement, and disclosure.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1007
Learn from this practical introduction to software applications most commonly used in business. Develop a basic working knowledge of a suite of business software applications that includes word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1009
This course provides a high-level overview of the functions and responsibilities performed by human resource professionals in contemporary businesses. Topics include job analysis and design, recruitment and selection, legal aspects of HR, training and development, HR planning, performance appraisals, compensation and benefits, occupational health and safety and employee relations. A brief introduction to the Alberta Employment Standards Code is also included.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1380
The organization of human productive energy is the central focus of this introductory course. Themes include balancing tasks, relationship requirements, and the needs of the organization with those of the individual. Specific topics include perception, personality, values, attitudes, motivation, group behaviour, and teamwork.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2003
Building on the theory and skills developed in BUSD 1006, Principles of Accounting, and BUSD 1007, Business Computer Applications, this course explores the software used for financial accounting. Students become familiar with the programs that make up current accounting software packages and their capabilities. Advanced functions of spreadsheets allow students to set up payroll and income tax functions. A review of database management systems will reveal the technology behind the most widely used accounting applications.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2006
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and procedures associated with the Canadian federal income tax system, the structure of the Income Tax Act of Canada, and the application of rules and procedures surrounding the determination of tax liability. Although both individual and corporate taxpayers will be considered, the primary emphasis will be on taxation as related to individuals. Some attention will also be given to the concepts and procedures associated with the federal goods and services tax (GST).
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2015
This introductory course in payroll includes a study of employment standards, designation of individuals as employees or contractors, record-keeping requirements, payroll calculations, taxable and non-taxable benefits, payroll journal entries, reporting requirements, and employee termination.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Addictions Recovery Practitioner

CourseTitleCredit
ADRP1011
Examine the relationship between mental health and substance use disorders.  Explore the development in policy, education, awareness, assessment and treatment. Specific issues include the relationship of concurrent disorders to trauma, cultural variations in understanding and responding to mental health and substance use issues, and unique needs of various populations.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
ADRP1013
Explore contributing factors, typical ages of onset, and changes in the prevalence, presentation, course, and assessment and treatment of mental health and substance use disorders across the lifespan. Issues and treatment approaches specific to the various age groups will be examined.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
MHAD1006
Examine the range and variety of public and private resources available to support individuals and families dealing with mental health and substance use issues. The role of worker-as-navigator will be explored along with advocacy methodologies and the challenges of practice in a regularly-changing environment.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
MHAD1007
This course will provide you with certification from Mental Health First Aid Canada. Learn to recognize signs and symptoms of mental health issues, initiate responses when help is needed and support a person to get appropriate professional help. Find more details at www.mentalhealthfirstaid.ca
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
MHAD1008
This course will provide you with certification in nonviolent crisis intervention from the Crisis Prevention Institute (www.crisisprevention.com).  Learn physical and nonphysical methods to manage disruptive behaviour and maintain safety for yourself and others. Last-resort skills to use in situations of imminent danger will also be included.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
MHAD1009
This course will provide you with certification in Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). This training is designed to help participants recognize and assess risk and intervene to prevent the immediate risk of suicide. (www.livingworks.net/programs/asist/).
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1

Administrative Professional

CourseTitleCredit
BUSD1009
This course provides a high-level overview of the functions and responsibilities performed by human resource professionals in contemporary businesses. Topics include job analysis and design, recruitment and selection, legal aspects of HR, training and development, HR planning, performance appraisals, compensation and benefits, occupational health and safety and employee relations. A brief introduction to the Alberta Employment Standards Code is also included.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1380
The organization of human productive energy is the central focus of this introductory course. Themes include balancing tasks, relationship requirements, and the needs of the organization with those of the individual. Specific topics include perception, personality, values, attitudes, motivation, group behaviour, and teamwork.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1163
Develop your keyboarding technique and enhance your keyboarding skills while increasing your speed and accuracy.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
BUSN1166
Create a variety of professional business documents.  Increase your proficiency and competency by using Word features such as character and paragraph formatting, columns, editing, tables, styles, and mail merge. Learn to use MS PowerPoint, and create professional business presentations using the advanced features such as transitions, animations, and master slides.
  • 50 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
5
BUSN1168
Learn to work with spreadsheets using MS Excel software and acquire skills in organizing, designing, and editing worksheets. Create formulas and functions (statistical, financial, database, and logical) for a variety of business applications and use footers, headers, formatting, and charts. You will progress through this course to the advanced features of Excel, including and will learn to use features such as Macros, Scenarios, PivotTables, and Solver to automate tasks, improve efficiency, and collect and analyze data.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 60 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
6
BUSN1173
Develop the written and verbal communication skills required of a business professional. In this course, you will examine business writing and develop various letters and memos in a business context. Using critical thinking, you will further practise and perfect your communication skills through critical analysis, persuasive writing, summaries, and oral presentations. APA format is taught and practised throughout the course.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1178
Learn to use the various functions of MS Access. Create queries, tables, forms, reports, and pivot tables. Continue to improve keyboarding speed and accuracy throughout the course.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1179
Develop your employability skills in this course. Learn to prepare a professional resume and handle an interview situation.  Develop work-related skills in team work, conflict management, problem solving and business ethics.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1186
Review and apply math concepts to solve business problems, and learn the basic skills required for financial applications, bookkeeping concepts, and procedures. Learn the basics of how financial transactions are recorded using manual and computerized bookkeeping systems.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1187
Develop skills in office procedures and organization. Study office ergonomics and customer service, learn how to process mail, carry out file-management procedures, learn to build travel itineraries, and develop skills for arranging and documenting meetings. Learn how to plan, design, implement, and minimize the risks for successful business events. Gain hands-on experience in designing and implementing an actual event.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
5
BUSN1193
Build on the skills you learned in Business Communications I. Study specific forms of business and employment communications. Learn to do business research and to document your sources using APA citation style. Learn basic graphic design principles for business communications.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Arts and Sciences

CourseTitleCredit
ANTH1000
This course general introduction to anthropology presents central concepts and key issues in the four main subfields—archaeology and biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology. Topics include evolutionary theory, human evolution and diversity, culture change, social organization, and symbolic systems. Students will explore broadly the question of what it means to be human.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ARTH1002
An introduction to the developments in art, architecture, and print culture in Western Europe, this course begins with the Italian Renaissance and ends with French Realism. Students will learn critical observation skills as the course draws on various scholarly strategies for interpreting visual material and cultural histories. Additionally, students will build on their existing writing skills and develop an interdisciplinary academic vocabulary.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL1007
This course provides an introduction to cell structure and the function of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Major topics include the chemical and molecular composition of cells, subcellular components, metabolism, and information flow.  These topics address how cells harvest and use energy, how cells reproduce, and how information in DNA is stored, transmitted, processed, and regulated. Pre-requisites: Biology 30 and Chemistry 30.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL1008
This course examines the diversity of life on earth from the origins of life through the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.  Using a phyletic approach to classification, the major taxonomic groups of organisms are introduced, including prokaryotes, numerous protists, plants, fungi, and animals. Features that adapt these organisms to their environment are emphasized using Darwinian evolution as the underlying principle.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL2008
Students will learn the basic properties of ecosystem, community and population ecology, including energy transfer, mineral cycling, community structure and dynamics, competition, predation, and population dynamics. Students will also perform lab and field work.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1002
Students examine the interaction between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include the fundamental principles of microeconomics; supply and demand; markets and welfare; government intervention; behaviour of the firm; market organization; and income distribution.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1008
Students examine how the economy behaves at the aggregate level and how national income is measured and determined. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; measuring gross domestic product, inflation, and unemployment; demand including the multiplier process; supply, business cycles, and long-term growth; money, banking, and monetary policy; inflation; interest rates; stagflation; deficits and fiscal policy; exchange rates and balance of payments; exchange rate policy; purchasing power, and interest-rate parity.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
CHEM1001
Students are introduced to the basic principles that form the foundation on which higher chemistry courses are built. This course covers fundamental chemistry concepts such as atomic theory, bonding models, periodicity of elements, and stoichiometry, as well as the nomenclature used in organic and inorganic chemistry. Energy changes associated with chemical transformations are discussed. Pre-requisite: Chemistry 30.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 15 Work Experience
3
CHEM1002
This course emphasizes the importance of chemical equilibrium as it applies to gases, acids and bases, solubility and precipitation reactions, and complex ion formation. Also studied are kinetics (rates of reactions, differential and integrated rate laws, the Arrhenius equation), catalysts, thermodynamics (spontaneity, entropy, free energy), and electrochemistry (balancing redox reactions, and calculating standard and non-standard cell potentials), with emphasis on some practical applications related to batteries, corrosion, and industrial processes.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
EASC1002
This course is an introduction to earth sciences and physical geography. Topics explored will include the four major earth systems—atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water), geosphere (earth), and biosphere (life)—and how these systems relate to human populations. Students will also explore how earth scientists conduct research, including types of analysis and technologies used in the field. There will be a special focus on the circulation of water and the atmosphere, and how these processes drive the distribution of life on the planet and shape the landscape we see. The course will also discuss many of the current issues surrounding human-environment interactions, including, but not limited to, climate change, erosion, natural disasters, air and water pollution, and freshwater resources.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL1011
This course introduces students to formal and rhetorical writing practices at the post-secondary level, with an emphasis on literary analysis and close reading. Instruction and practice will be integrated with the study of literature drawn from a broad range of historical periods, cultural perspectives, social contexts, and literary genres (including fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction articles and essays, news media, and other cultural texts). Specific themes and texts will vary between sections.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL1039
This course will examine a broad range of written and oral forms of storytelling by First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples, with a focus on Canadian writers, stories, and history. Beginning with the historical contexts of storying Indigenous lives and moving through to current time, students will engage with a variety of Indigenous cultural productions including novels, short fiction, poems, plays, orature, spoken word, podcasts, films, and critical theory. Issues of racialization and colonialism, trauma and shame, authenticity, relationship to the land, diaspora, and love and sexuality will be examined, always with an eye to the ways in which storytelling has been used as a means to share, support, and produce cultural and community resilience.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2228
This course will explore a variety of popular literary and visual forms, and examine the history, social functions, and concerns of popular fiction and visual cultures. Potential genres of study may include graphic novels, romance, science fiction, detective fiction/mystery, young adult literature, and slam and other forms of popular poetry, as well as visual art forms such as documentary, social media, and graffiti art. Using these texts as a lens, students will explore how the phenomenon of popularity and “mass appeal” relates to issues of cultural capital and literary taste. Particular attention will be paid to defining popular culture across time and place, and examining the role of audiences and their reception of popular forms of representation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2550
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
INST1000
This course focuses on the history, identity, and culture of Indigenous peoples in Canada, with a special focus on Treaties 6, 7, and 8 in Alberta. Beginning with the history and geography of Indigenous peoples and Turtle Island (North America) and ending with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), this course provides a big-picture overview of Indigenous Studies in Canada. Key topics and themes may include the following: contact and the fur trade era, colonization and settlement, the Royal Proclamation, the Indian Act, the bison hunt, identity, the TRC, missing and murdered Indigenous women, children in care and the welfare system, decolonizing Canadian law, gender and identity, status, determinants of health, impacts of residential schools, racism and stereotypes, the reservation system, reclaiming and celebrating culture, language and storytelling, the Sixties Scoop, and trauma. This course utilizes media such as podcasts, videos, blogs, and interactive maps to complement traditional course readings and may also include a community participation component.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
INST1152
This course is an introduction to Plains Cree (Y dialect) grammar and vocabulary, with practice in speaking. No prior Cree knowledge is required. This course is open to non-Cree speakers only.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
INST1376
This course explores holistic health-promotion strategies of resilience that interweave Indigenous history, culture, and spirit. There are profound gaps in health for Indigenous peoples for almost every indicator in mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual health, and these are exacerbated by social issues such as systemic racism, poverty, and intergenerational trauma. The reconciliation of present-day health disparities involves rethinking and implementing changes in current health fields and practices. Students will engage with Indigenous ways of teaching, learning, and knowing, including narrative as a form of therapeutic practice.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1000
Designed to present a critical overview of the major concepts and themes in political science, this course introduces the major subfields, including Canadian politics, political theory, international relations, comparative politics, and gender and politics. It addresses many traditional subjects of the field, such as power relations, theories of the state and democracy, international institutions, evolving conceptualizations of citizenship, and political economy. The course further examines critical questions surrounding colonialism and race relations, the politics of poverty and inequity, and the role of the media in political controversies.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1010
This course explores the development of Canadian political institutions and political issues in Canada.  The student will learn about contemporary Canadian politics by examining the evolution of federalism, the Constitution, parliament, Aboriginal and minority rights, the welfare state, multiculturalism, and similar topics.  The course focuses on teaching critical thinking and writing skills by testing normative and empirical theories against Canadian historical and contemporary evidence.  Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1040
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1050
Build on your introductory knowledge of the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. Focus on the study of cognition (thinking), intelligence and creativity, motivation and emotion, personality, health, stress, and coping, psychological disorders, therapies, and social behaviour. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2010
Study the biological, cognitive, moral, emotional, and social changes that occur in an individual during the human lifespan. Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2450
Acquire an overview of the common psychiatric conditions and their symptoms, causes, and treatment modalities. The role of the mental health worker as part of the multidisciplinary team working with clients with mental health disorders is addressed. You will discuss attitudes, stigma, and the influences of culture. Class readings, web-based learning, group discussions, and assignments help illustrate this material.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI2025
This course introduces students to the sociological study of crime through theoretical and practical analyses, including the examination and attempted explanation of crime, crime patterns, social processes leading to criminal behaviour, and responses to crime.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI2373
This course examines the experience of dying and death through various socio-cultural contexts. Students will be exposed to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of death and dying.  Questions relating to life and living as well as dying and death will be explored and addressed. The course highlights the importance of paying attention to the experience of dying and death that is common to all species and every culture.  It exposes students to the reality of dying and death that is often denied in North American culture today.  The course also seeks to demystify death by allowing students to see it as a common human experience thereby equipping students with the knowledge and skills necessary to begin to deal with dying, death, bereavement, and grief. Students will focus on the topics of aging, the dying process, death, bereavement, and grief as they relate to individuals and caregivers. Current North American practices regarding death will be explored, as well as cross-cultural interpretations of dying, death, and bereavement. The course also addresses ethical issues related to dying and death in contemporary North American institutions and communities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
STAT1151
Students will learn the basic principles of statistics, acquire the skills to solve elementary statistical and probability problems, and gain hands-on experience with well-known statistical software, as well as basic methods for collecting data. Students will also learn the main tools of descriptive statistics to visualize collected data, analyze data distributions, and establish correlations and regressions between random variables. The course will also cover the main tools of inferential statistics for estimating mean values and proportions by confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, and one-way ANOVA. Applications are taken from wide range of subject areas such as biology and environmental science, business and economics, health sciences, education, crime and law, politics, social studies, and sports and entertainment.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 18 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WMST2010
This course is a critical feminist examination of embodied lives in differing social locations. The course challenges the traditional dichotomies of mind/body, culture/nature, and public/private in the treatment of such topics as the feminization of poverty; sexualities, reproduction, and family life; violence against women; women and religion; masculinities; and culture and body image.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Business Administration

CourseTitleCredit
BUSD1001
This course focuses on the principles of effective business communication, both written and spoken. Specific topics include the writing process, improving grammar, writing a research paper, documenting with APA style, and preparing for public speaking. The process of revising and editing is emphasized throughout the course.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1002
Students examine the interaction between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include the fundamental principles of microeconomics; supply and demand; markets and welfare; government intervention; behaviour of the firm; market organization; and income distribution.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1003
This course emphasizes the wide range of mathematical calculations that are commonly used in the business world. Topics include simple interest, compound interest, future and present values, annuities, amortization, and bond valuation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1004
This course provides an introduction to accounting procedures and financial statements and their underlying concepts and principles. Within this framework, accounting practice is integrated with the development of accounting information for effective decision making.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1005
Students will study specific forms of business and employment communication, including business letters and memoranda, resumes, covering letters for job applications and interviewing, formal report writing, graphic design principles, and business meetings.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1006
This course will further examine accounting procedures and their underlying concepts and principles. Students learn about additional standards and problems of valuation, income measurement, and disclosure.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1007
Learn from this practical introduction to software applications most commonly used in business. Develop a basic working knowledge of a suite of business software applications that includes word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1008
Students examine how the economy behaves at the aggregate level and how national income is measured and determined. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics; measuring gross domestic product, inflation, and unemployment; demand including the multiplier process; supply, business cycles, and long-term growth; money, banking, and monetary policy; inflation; interest rates; stagflation; deficits and fiscal policy; exchange rates and balance of payments; exchange rate policy; purchasing power, and interest-rate parity.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1009
This course provides a high-level overview of the functions and responsibilities performed by human resource professionals in contemporary businesses. Topics include job analysis and design, recruitment and selection, legal aspects of HR, training and development, HR planning, performance appraisals, compensation and benefits, occupational health and safety and employee relations. A brief introduction to the Alberta Employment Standards Code is also included.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1013
This course will introduce students to the basic aspects of managing, and is structured around the key management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and control. Students will acquire the skills needed to become an effective and efficient manager.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1014
This course discusses concepts and calculations relating to money, credit, and risk management. Students will learn the tools, calculations, and components needed to complete a financial plan, the time value of money, financial goal setting, and tax planning concepts. The fundamental concepts of investing, mutual funds, stocks, and bonds will also be taught. Retirement and estate planning concepts, including annuity and retirement income calculations, will be discussed.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD1380
The organization of human productive energy is the central focus of this introductory course. Themes include balancing tasks, relationship requirements, and the needs of the organization with those of the individual. Specific topics include perception, personality, values, attitudes, motivation, group behaviour, and teamwork.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2001
This course examines financial accounting topics in-depth. It explores recent developments in accounting valuation and income determination and the related disclosure practices and reporting procedures recommended by professional accounting associations and applied in business today. The primary focus is on a comprehensive treatment of assets and liabilities. Special topics are introduced where appropriate.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2002
This course is the first of a two-part, in-depth study that examines the concepts of cost and managerial accounting. Major topics include cost-volume profit-analysis, relevant costs and short-term decision making, responsibility accounting, standard costing and variance analysis, and product costing and cost flow.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2003
Building on the theory and skills developed in BUSD 1006, Principles of Accounting, and BUSD 1007, Business Computer Applications, this course explores the software used for financial accounting. Students become familiar with the programs that make up current accounting software packages and their capabilities. Advanced functions of spreadsheets allow students to set up payroll and income tax functions. A review of database management systems will reveal the technology behind the most widely used accounting applications.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2004
This course continues the in-depth examination of financial accounting topics begun in BUSD 2001, Intermediate Accounting I. Emphasis is placed on accounting valuation, income determination, and the related disclosure practices and reporting procedures required in Canada today. The focus is on capitalization of Canadian corporations and the individual accounting and reporting problems associated with corporate income taxes, pensions, leases, and the Statement of Changes in Financial Position.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2005
This course is the second of a two-part, in-depth study that examines the concepts of cost/managerial accounting. Major topics include pricing decisions, product profitability, cost management, the balanced scorecard, cost allocation, joint products and byproducts, sales variances, customer profitability, spoilage scrap and rework, capital budgeting, management control systems, and performance measurement.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2006
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and procedures associated with the Canadian federal income tax system, the structure of the Income Tax Act of Canada, and the application of rules and procedures surrounding the determination of tax liability. Although both individual and corporate taxpayers will be considered, the primary emphasis will be on taxation as related to individuals. Some attention will also be given to the concepts and procedures associated with the federal goods and services tax (GST).
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2007
This course focuses on methods of locating qualified candidates, employing appropriate recruitment channels, and improving the overall efficiency of the recruitment process. Competencies are built by examining such aspects as an aging workforce, increased competition for available labour, dynamic environmental conditions, and the demand for qualified candidates. Students also learn about the implications of selecting inappropriate candidates and why this can be a costly and time-consuming proposition
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2008
Through case analysis and assignments, students learn to make strategic marketing decisions relating to product, pricing, supply and distribution, and integrated marketing communications.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2009
This course addresses important cross-cultural aspects of leadership and related subjects such as diversity management, teamwork, decision making, and negotiations. Drawing from "real-life" work situations and challenges, participants will be exposed to case studies and small-group activities designed to articulate and reconcile cross-cultural business/organizational dilemmas.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2011
Students learn the foundation and guidelines for an effective process of employee recruitment, evaluation, and compensation. This course explores competency assessments, performance reviews, individual career planning, monetary and non-monetary benefits, and ongoing feedback to ensure that the HR plan is competitive and fair. Students will demonstrate the use of a number of tools used by the human resource department, suggest different methods and approaches to improve performance in an organization, and identify issues of concern to a company and recommend methods to improve results.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2012
This course provides a broad introduction to the body of law governing the employment relationship. The emphasis is primarily on employment law in Canada, with selected references to practices in other jurisdictions. The learner will become familiar with specific areas of law and will apply concepts and terminology to solve problems related to effective human resource management. Additional topics include collective bargaining, grievance and arbitration processes, labour–management collaboration, and the nonunion workplace.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2013
In the 21st century, organizations and workplaces experience constant change. Change in leadership, organizational structure, operational systems, and business culture all impact individuals and business outcomes. This course focuses on the people involved in and impacted by change. Students learn organizational change strategies through a number of different frameworks, examine interventions for different levels of the organization, and acquire the tools to effectively manage the change process.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2014
This course introduces employee benefits planning and administration from a total compensation perspective. Students review various benefit plans including those with health, disability, insurance, retirement, paid time off, and work schedule benefits. The course also explores new developments in the field of employee benefits, specifically emerging benefit plans and contemporary issues such as flexible benefits plans, demographic changes, part-time workers, and legislative initiatives. Additional topics include wage and salary administration techniques, including job analysis, job evaluation, and compensation surveys.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2015
This introductory course in payroll includes a study of employment standards, designation of individuals as employees or contractors, record-keeping requirements, payroll calculations, taxable and non-taxable benefits, payroll journal entries, reporting requirements, and employee termination.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2016
Students learn the valuable skill of preparing for negotiations and assessing alternatives. Through the study of theory and application of techniques in role-playing exercises, students will build on the ability to negotiate. Negotiation skills are essential in daily interactions with others. The focus of the course will be how to change an uncertain situation into a manageable relationship. Students will also be introduced to the steps of the bargaining and collaborative process as well as the approach to interpersonal and labour-related negotiations.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2017
This course provides an overview of the role of training and development in human resource management. Key elements covered include analyzing the training needs of an organization; program design, development, and delivery; and program evaluation. Other topics include adult learning theory, career planning, counselling, training techniques, sources of training, budgeting, and trends in training. Students will learn to assess the value of employee training in relation to the prospective of the organization.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2018
Students will explore the impact of business decisions on social and environmental issues relevant to real-life work situations, with an emphasis on the kinds of problems most students will encounter as decision makers. Students will interpret ethical concepts that are relevant to resolving ethical dilemmas, and formulate the moral reasoning and analytical skills needed to resolve ethical dilemmas.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2019
This course deals with the art of strategy: how to identify and choose a superior competitive position, how to analyze a strategic situation, and finally how to create the organizational context to make the chosen strategy work. Students will learn to explore conceptual frameworks and models that will assist them in analyzing competitive situations and strategic dilemmas while gaining insight into strategic management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2021
Students will learn how retailing has developed, how retail outlets operate, and how retailers apply retail sales management techniques. Students will also consider factors that affect retailing: globalization, the impact of changing technology, and social and ethical issues. Additional topics include retail planning and supply, location, demand-driven supply, distribution channels, and delivering customer value.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2022
This course focuses on putting the student in the position of an entrepreneur with a new idea and teaches the student how to build that idea into a business case. This course covers the basics of starting a business, from idea assessment to insurance, in a step-by-step manner. Students will learn to identify the strategic options facing a growing business, as well as a range of practical solutions.  Topics will include all aspects of managing, marketing, operating, and administering the venture during this critical stage.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2023
Students take an in-depth look at social and digital media communication technologies from the perspective of a small-to-medium-sized enterprise (SME). Students learn the potential impact of these technologies and how they can be used to build long-term customer relationships by allowing their customers to connect, collaborate, and then share ideas and information. Through a practical approach, students learn about social and digital media trends and technology, return on investment (ROI) of social media strategies, social media best practices, web analytics, search engine optimization (SEO), blogging, podcasting, mobile marketing, and web-based advertising strategies. Students design, develop, and present an integrated social and digital media strategy for an SME.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2024
Topics include processes that are used for all types of work, including new product development, and production and delivery of goods and services. This course will provide students with a set of tools that they can use to improve work processes. Students will learn to conduct systematic root-cause analysis to discover process improvements aimed at making processes more cost-effective, dependable, responsive, and flexible. Students will also be introduced to techniques for setting organizational objectives and priorities for process improvement initiatives such as Six Sigma and Lean Management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2025
This course focuses on the principles and practices of logistics. Students explore the emergence of logistics as a major component of corporate success and develop a clear understanding of the intricacies of various logistics systems and the interrelationships among them. The emerging importance of logistics in both the public and private sectors is also studied.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2026
This course explores the fundamental concepts of Lean Manufacturing and the tools and techniques used to analyze and measure work systems. Students learn about several techniques that can bring about improvements in organizational productivity and the reduction of waste. As well, the basics of time study, work sampling, and the learning curve are investigated. Video resources are used throughout the course to illustrate concepts in manufacturing and service environments.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2027
Under the influence of global markets and international competition, the quality of products has acquired a totally new level of significance as a business strategy for operational survival. Students will be well prepared to implement a cost-effective quality management system, with its technical, legal, and human aspects, in any organization.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2030
Examine the objectives of financial management and the related role and responsibilities of the financial manager. The approach is practical in nature with references to the development of theories in finance. Using a corporate framework, explore the various sources of funds for a firm.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2031
In this course, learners have an opportunity to gain a technical understanding of personal financial planning. Concepts include elements that impact an individual or family’s financial well-being. The process of collecting and analyzing required information to begin the financial planning process is examined. This course prepares learners with fundamental financial planning knowledge.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2032
This course examines the roles and structures of financial markets, financial intermediaries, and regulations of the financial industry in Canada, as well as providing a brief overview of foreign exchange markets. The FinTech industry will be explored, and students will learn new financial technology trends and their use in the current financial landscape.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2033
This course will examine the way in which business and society assess, control, and transfer risk. Students will be prepared to function in a business environment, developing an awareness of the challenges, tools, and the process of designing and implementing a risk management program. Students will learn how to identify risks and the associated potential costs, analyze the causes of risk, and evaluate strategies to treat risk.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2035
Students will learn how to conduct credit investigations, calculate the cost of borrowing, identify how to minimize credit default situations, distinguish various types of consumer mortgage loans, register land titles, and complete a mortgage disbursement and documentation requirements. Students will use online learning tools and gain the knowledge required to identify business lending opportunities; understand small business operations, financial statements, and general accounting principles; and review financial ratios and understand their value in assessing business strengths and weaknesses. The course will assess the student’s ability to work through a real business-lending scenario using a practical simulation of the full application, analysis, and decision process.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2036
This course focuses on the skills and abilities that students will require in order to sell financial services to customers in the banking, investment, and insurance sectors. It examines the role of personal selling in a company's strategy, including models of communication and methods of selling. A primary focus is the development of applied selling skills that focuses on the attitudes and behaviours of successful salespeople. This course also studies the impact of business decisions on social and environmental issues relevant to real-life work situations, with an emphasis on the kinds of problems most students will encounter as decision makers. Students will interpret ethical concepts that are relevant to resolving ethical dilemmas and formulate the moral reasoning and analytical skills needed to resolve ethical dilemmas.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2037
This course reviews the applications of consumer and commercial credit and analysis techniques. Management of accounts receivable, collections, and bankruptcy will be examined to give students an overview of the credit industry. Financial simulation models are used to practise analysis techniques.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2038
This course provides an overview of the basic financial tools used by managers in planning and controlling their areas. Topics will include the analysis and classification of different types of costs, examination of financial ratios in comparison to industry averages, financial statement analysis, financial forecasting tools and techniques, financial and operating leverage, working capital and its impact on decision making, current asset management, sources of short-term financing, time value of money calculations, and big data analytics tools and techniques used in banking.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2039
This course provides foundational knowledge that prepares mutual fund representatives to give effective advice to clients about mutual fund investments based on a client’s objectives, timeline, and risk tolerance. It also provides greater insight into legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities. The sequence of instruction mirrors the typical process used with clients in the real world. A challenging case study and practice exam enable students to put knowledge into practice. Successful completion of the Canadian Investment Funds Course (CIFC) Exam meets the proficiency requirements set by provincial securities commissions for mutual fund licensing.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2040
Using the technical information provided in Personal Financial Planning I and Financial Markets and Products, learners have the opportunity for practical application of personal financial planning. The focus of the course is on evaluating customer needs and applying the financial planning process and practices to provide appropriate recommendations.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2041
The purpose of this course is to provide detailed information on insurance and how it is used to mitigate risk. Insurance will be discussed in detail from the perspective of the individual, business succession, and the insurance industry. Topics will include the principles of insurance, needs analyses for life, disability and critical care, and home and car insurance. The need for protection from loss of income, long-term care, disability income, employee benefits, and government benefits will also be covered.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2042
This course examines the roles and structures of financial markets, intermediaries, and regulatory structures with a focus on the financial planning profession. Students will gain an understanding of credit and debt management, economics, and human behaviour as it relates to the financial planning process.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2190
The solution to marketing problems rests in sound analysis of consumer behaviour. Using the case method, you will find a practical outlet for quantitative and qualitative consumer analysis tools. Cases will explore both goods and services marketing in both industrial and consumer environments.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2230
Study the objectives of financial management and the related role and responsibilities of the financial manager. The approach is practical in nature with references to the development of theories in finance. The various applications of funds by the firm are explored in this sequential course using a corporate framework.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD2620
Learn how to develop computer-based accounting information systems, and how such information systems support decision making at all levels of management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSD3010
Gain a general overview of the Canadian legal system, with emphasis on underlying considerations of social policy. Analyze selected topics from the fields of tort and contract, while considering the nature, sources, philosophy, and policy objectives of the law.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Community Support Worker

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1016
This course provides learners with the skills they need to create the documents, spreadsheets, and presentations needed in college human services programs and employment in human services.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COSW1005
This course introduces students to the distinct pre-contact world views of First Nations and Inuit, and the later world view of the Metis of North America. Students will examine the territories, stories, and contributions that these original cultures created through their relationship with their unique environments. Students will explore the common issues that Indigenous peoples around the world face in their history, geography, politics, economics, education, and culture. The course will also reflect on the intersection of Indigenous world views and cultures with dominant Western world views and cultures.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COSW1100
Learn the roles of support workers within diverse communities. Identify the skills, knowledge, and practices necessary to implement effective support interventions and service resources in the local community.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Dental Office Assistant

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1006
Develop foundational computer skills and become proficient using Windows, as well as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications to enhance your computer skills and employability.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HLTH1016
In this course, students are introduced to dental terminology by learning how to read and interpret commonly used dental terms, symbols, and abbreviations. Students will also develop an understanding of basic dental anatomy. An emphasis is placed on the clinical environment of the dental practice, medical emergency response, and infection prevention and control. Students will also examine dental procedures, fee codes, and dental charting.
  • 60 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
6

Disability Studies

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1007
This course focuses on the development and practice of writing skills and forms of written communication required for success in educational and human services settings. Topics include an overview of the writing process, using correct grammar, developing writing strategies, writing essays, writing for business, and proofreading.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1016
This course provides learners with the skills they need to create the documents, spreadsheets, and presentations needed in college human services programs and employment in human services.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Early Learning and Child Care

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1007
This course focuses on the development and practice of writing skills and forms of written communication required for success in educational and human services settings. Topics include an overview of the writing process, using correct grammar, developing writing strategies, writing essays, writing for business, and proofreading.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1016
This course provides learners with the skills they need to create the documents, spreadsheets, and presentations needed in college human services programs and employment in human services.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1000
This course focuses on the development of children from conception to twelve years of age, including the physical child, the thinking child, the social child, and the whole child, as well as introducing atypical development. Students will study key theories and theorists in child development.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1002
This survey course focuses on understanding the goals and essential components of developing successful early childhood programs. By studying the role of early childhood professionals, students will gain insight into their own philosophy of early childhood education.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1006
Students will develop an understanding of the role of play in a child’s growth and learning. They will also learn about the role of the environment and the early childhood practitioner in enhancing children’s play. This course focuses on the planning of inclusive and appropriate play environments, including indoor and outdoor play experiences. Students will explore a variety of play situations and materials used in child-care settings.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1007
This introductory course will provide students with an understanding of early literacy. Students will learn strategies that can be used to develop a child's interest and skills related to listening, speaking, reading, and writing that form the foundation of a language arts curriculum. Students will also explore the effective use of children's literature, storytelling, puppetry, and dramatic play and the importance of cultural considerations and individual differences.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ELCC1008
This introductory course provides an understanding of children's behaviour in a developmental context, and the importance of realistic expectations of children in various stages. The social development of the young child will be examined in the context of positive guidance to support self-regulation. Appropriate strategies to help children to develop positive self-esteem and develop appropriate behaviour will be discussed. The prevention of behaviour problems through developmentally appropriate practices and interventions will be emphasized.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Environmental Protection Technology

CourseTitleCredit
BIOL1007
This course provides an introduction to cell structure and the function of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Major topics include the chemical and molecular composition of cells, subcellular components, metabolism, and information flow.  These topics address how cells harvest and use energy, how cells reproduce, and how information in DNA is stored, transmitted, processed, and regulated. Pre-requisites: Biology 30 and Chemistry 30.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL1008
This course examines the diversity of life on earth from the origins of life through the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.  Using a phyletic approach to classification, the major taxonomic groups of organisms are introduced, including prokaryotes, numerous protists, plants, fungi, and animals. Features that adapt these organisms to their environment are emphasized using Darwinian evolution as the underlying principle.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BIOL2008
Students will learn the basic properties of ecosystem, community and population ecology, including energy transfer, mineral cycling, community structure and dynamics, competition, predation, and population dynamics. Students will also perform lab and field work.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
BUSN1167
Become familiar with MS Excel and MS Outlook. Learn how to design, organize, and edit MS Excel spreadsheets. You will create formulas and functions (statistical, financial, database, and logical) for a variety of business applications and use footers, headers, formatting, and charts. Using MS Outlook, you will learn to send and receive mail, schedule appointments, set up meetings, organize contacts, and create tasks and notes.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
CHEM1001
Students are introduced to the basic principles that form the foundation on which higher chemistry courses are built. This course covers fundamental chemistry concepts such as atomic theory, bonding models, periodicity of elements, and stoichiometry, as well as the nomenclature used in organic and inorganic chemistry. Energy changes associated with chemical transformations are discussed. Pre-requisite: Chemistry 30.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 15 Work Experience
3
CHEM1002
This course emphasizes the importance of chemical equilibrium as it applies to gases, acids and bases, solubility and precipitation reactions, and complex ion formation. Also studied are kinetics (rates of reactions, differential and integrated rate laws, the Arrhenius equation), catalysts, thermodynamics (spontaneity, entropy, free energy), and electrochemistry (balancing redox reactions, and calculating standard and non-standard cell potentials), with emphasis on some practical applications related to batteries, corrosion, and industrial processes.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
EASC1002
This course is an introduction to earth sciences and physical geography. Topics explored will include the four major earth systems—atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water), geosphere (earth), and biosphere (life)—and how these systems relate to human populations. Students will also explore how earth scientists conduct research, including types of analysis and technologies used in the field. There will be a special focus on the circulation of water and the atmosphere, and how these processes drive the distribution of life on the planet and shape the landscape we see. The course will also discuss many of the current issues surrounding human-environment interactions, including, but not limited to, climate change, erosion, natural disasters, air and water pollution, and freshwater resources.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI1121
Students will learn to identify the basic scientific and social principles that underlie current major environmental issues. Students will also examine local and global case studies and will study the effects of pollution and resource degradation on society.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI1226
Students will study the dangers of hazardous materials using standard industrial classification systems, and will learn safe emergency response procedures for spill incidents and the use of protective suits and respirators. They will to recognize and control common contaminated sites hazards through the development of site health and safety plans.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2305
Students will study the principles of toxicology and the toxicological testing of chemicals, with emphasis on environmental pollutants.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2310
Students will learn the principles of pollution prevention, waste minimization, recycling, landfill operation, incineration, and composting. They will also study the basic concepts of environmental management systems and environmental audits.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2315
Students will gain experience with field sampling procedures, instrumentation, and analytical methods used in water, soil, and sediment assessment and control.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 36 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2400
Students will learn the basic principles of environmental physics. Students will build, analyze, and critique physical models of environmental processes. They will apply environmental physics concepts to topical problems such as consumer energy use, renewable energy resources, carbon footprint, water use, waste, and global warming.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2401
Students will conduct laboratory investigations related to environmental physics concepts such as energy use, electrical power generation, and fluid statics and dynamics. Students will use computers to obtain and analyze data, and to write reports.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
ENVI2405
Students will study current environmental legislation at the federal, provincial, and municipal levels. They will learn the correct procedures for adhering to current legislation. Students will participate in a project to propose a new legislation or bylaw and will identify and interact with relevant stakeholders.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2410
Students will learn the principles of operation of physical, chemical, and biological treatment systems for water and wastewater. They will also learn the principles of flood control, erosion prevention, and other methods of aquatic habitat protection.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2415
Students will gain experience with comprehensive sampling, instrumentation, and analytical techniques used in ambient air and source monitoring. Students will also learn to apply the scientific principles underlying air monitoring and air quality issues.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2420
Students will learn the basic principles of contaminated sites management, including site assessment procedures, remediation methods, and the regulatory framework. They will also study the movement of contaminants in soils and groundwater.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 45 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENVI2901
Students will discuss the scope of research projects in environmental protection in the context of their relevance to the environmental industry and needs of society. They will make a preliminary research project selection, discuss how to carry it out, and provide feedback to their classmates on their proposed research.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
ENVI2902
Students will engage in an intensive study of a selected topic in environmental protection technology. They will select a research topic, collect and interpret data, write a report on the results of the project, and present their results.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
STAT1151
Students will learn the basic principles of statistics, acquire the skills to solve elementary statistical and probability problems, and gain hands-on experience with well-known statistical software, as well as basic methods for collecting data. Students will also learn the main tools of descriptive statistics to visualize collected data, analyze data distributions, and establish correlations and regressions between random variables. The course will also cover the main tools of inferential statistics for estimating mean values and proportions by confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, and one-way ANOVA. Applications are taken from wide range of subject areas such as biology and environmental science, business and economics, health sciences, education, crime and law, politics, social studies, and sports and entertainment.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 18 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Hospital Unit Clerk

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1006
Develop foundational computer skills and become proficient using Windows, as well as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications to enhance your computer skills and employability.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HLTH1003
Study the language of medical terminology. Learn to understand and interpret commonly used medical terms, symbols, and abbreviations. Develop your knowledge of rules, prefixes, suffixes, roots, combining forms, body systems, diagnostics, and basic medication classifications. Achieve fluency through practice sessions, quizzes, and exercises.
  • 60 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
6

Interdisciplinary Therapy Assistant

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1000
Study the basics of normal anatomy and physiology. The structure and function of each body system is covered, and the relationship between the structure and function of each system is explored. Learn about the interactions of body systems.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DEMC1011
This is a creative and dynamic approach to dementia care that is suitable for caregivers, both formal and informal, in a variety of care settings. Comprehensive information about dementia from diagnosis to end stage is discussed in a practical and interactive manner.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
RHAB1001
Learn the fundamental concepts and theories specific to rehabilitation and gain an introduction to the field of rehabilitation medicine. Examine the common practices and unique roles of physical therapy, therapeutic recreation, and occupational therapy, and explore the skills, roles, and traits of the therapy assistant.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WELL1000
Further your understanding of the field of therapeutic recreation and learn about the models of care in the therapeutic recreation process that guide service delivery. Discuss the Leisure Ability Model as a framework to service, with a focus on promoting a client’s wellness through goal-oriented leisure activities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Medical Office Assistant

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1006
Develop foundational computer skills and become proficient using Windows, as well as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications to enhance your computer skills and employability.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HLTH1003
Study the language of medical terminology. Learn to understand and interpret commonly used medical terms, symbols, and abbreviations. Develop your knowledge of rules, prefixes, suffixes, roots, combining forms, body systems, diagnostics, and basic medication classifications. Achieve fluency through practice sessions, quizzes, and exercises.
  • 60 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
6

Medical Device Reprocessing Technician

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Mental Health Recovery Practitioner

CourseTitleCredit
MHAD1006
Examine the range and variety of public and private resources available to support individuals and families dealing with mental health and substance use issues. The role of worker-as-navigator will be explored along with advocacy methodologies and the challenges of practice in a regularly-changing environment.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
MHAD1007
This course will provide you with certification from Mental Health First Aid Canada. Learn to recognize signs and symptoms of mental health issues, initiate responses when help is needed and support a person to get appropriate professional help. Find more details at www.mentalhealthfirstaid.ca
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
MHAD1008
This course will provide you with certification in nonviolent crisis intervention from the Crisis Prevention Institute (www.crisisprevention.com).  Learn physical and nonphysical methods to manage disruptive behaviour and maintain safety for yourself and others. Last-resort skills to use in situations of imminent danger will also be included.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
MHAD1009
This course will provide you with certification in Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). This training is designed to help participants recognize and assess risk and intervene to prevent the immediate risk of suicide. (www.livingworks.net/programs/asist/).
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
1
MHRP1000
Learn about the effects of local, provincial/territorial and national health systems and social systems on the provision of services to individuals with mental health or substance use issues.  Legislation relating to information privacy, mental health, substance use, criminal and family law, and the delivery of services will be reviewed.  Initiatives to improve outcomes of individuals experiencing mental health or substance use crisis will be explored. Examine personal and professional ethical and regulatory frameworks for practice.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2
MHRP1001
Explore how mental illness affects family dynamics and ways in which the family can assist in recovery.  The client’s 'family' may be broadly defined. Health promotion, strengths-based approaches, and family-related social determinants of health are considered.  A family's culture is highlighted in determining the best approach to helping. Practice assessment skills for clients and their families in the lab.
  • 20 Lecture
  • 10 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
2

Optical Office Assistant

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1006
Develop foundational computer skills and become proficient using Windows, as well as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications to enhance your computer skills and employability.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HLTH1019
Study optical terminology. Learn how to read and interpret commonly used optical medical terms, symbols, and abbreviations. Develop your understanding of anatomy and basic pathology related to the eye. Become familiar with frequently prescribed medications and their uses. Achieve fluency through practice sessions, quizzes, and exercises.
  • 60 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
6

Pharmacy Technician

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1000
Study the basics of normal anatomy and physiology. The structure and function of each body system is covered, and the relationship between the structure and function of each system is explored. Learn about the interactions of body systems.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1010
This course focuses on the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders. It gives learners a foundation for understanding the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan. The course includes common disease entities as examples of pathological processes. Each pathological process is explained as a concept and illustrated by typical diseases and disorders. Disease is discussed in terms of manifestations, etiology, and complications. Learners will gain a basic understanding of the diagnosis and management of the disease process associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Physical Therapy Assistant

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1000
Study the basics of normal anatomy and physiology. The structure and function of each body system is covered, and the relationship between the structure and function of each system is explored. Learn about the interactions of body systems.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM2011
Explore the importance of communication skills in developing caring relationships with clients and working effectively within the health-care team. Learn to vary your communication techniques and methods in different situations. Explore various concepts and principles of therapeutic communication and consider their implications for professional practice. Transfer: AU
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1010
This course focuses on the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders. It gives learners a foundation for understanding the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan. The course includes common disease entities as examples of pathological processes. Each pathological process is explained as a concept and illustrated by typical diseases and disorders. Disease is discussed in terms of manifestations, etiology, and complications. Learners will gain a basic understanding of the diagnosis and management of the disease process associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
RHAB1001
Learn the fundamental concepts and theories specific to rehabilitation and gain an introduction to the field of rehabilitation medicine. Examine the common practices and unique roles of physical therapy, therapeutic recreation, and occupational therapy, and explore the skills, roles, and traits of the therapy assistant.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Practical Nurse

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1001
Study the organization of the human body and the structures and functions of the body systems that provide support and movement, coordination, and regulation. Learn how body systems work together to maintain homeostasis. Terminology used by health professionals will be introduced. In the Practical Nurse program, a final mark of C- is required to progress to PATH 1000.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ANPH1002
Study the organization of the human body and the structures and functions of the body systems that provide transport and protection; absorption, diffusion, and excretion; and reproduction. Learn how body systems work together to maintain homeostasis. Terminology used by health professionals and theory and principles related to microbiology will be introduced. In the Practical Nurse program, a final mark of C- is required to progress to PATH 1000.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2550
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1000
This course builds upon previous knowledge of human anatomy and physiology by exploring the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders that produce alterations in human physiological function. The etiology, pathophysiology, complications, and clinical manifestations of select acute and chronic alterations across the lifespan are examined to gain a basic understanding of these pathophysiological changes. Major concepts associated with disease are examined through a holistic lens.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Practical Nurse Refresher

CourseTitleCredit
ENGL2550
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Settlement Studies

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1007
This course focuses on the development and practice of writing skills and forms of written communication required for success in educational and human services settings. Topics include an overview of the writing process, using correct grammar, developing writing strategies, writing essays, writing for business, and proofreading.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COSW1050
Examine the historical foundations of Aboriginal culture.  Study the key events that have impacted Aboriginal individuals, families, and communities.  Focus on the application of Aboriginal cultural awareness and knowledge of Aboriginal history to community support practice.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Social Work

CourseTitleCredit
ENGL1011
This course introduces students to formal and rhetorical writing practices at the post-secondary level, with an emphasis on literary analysis and close reading. Instruction and practice will be integrated with the study of literature drawn from a broad range of historical periods, cultural perspectives, social contexts, and literary genres (including fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction articles and essays, news media, and other cultural texts). Specific themes and texts will vary between sections.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2550
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1010
This course explores the development of Canadian political institutions and political issues in Canada.  The student will learn about contemporary Canadian politics by examining the evolution of federalism, the Constitution, parliament, Aboriginal and minority rights, the welfare state, multiculturalism, and similar topics.  The course focuses on teaching critical thinking and writing skills by testing normative and empirical theories against Canadian historical and contemporary evidence.  Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1040
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1050
Build on your introductory knowledge of the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. Focus on the study of cognition (thinking), intelligence and creativity, motivation and emotion, personality, health, stress, and coping, psychological disorders, therapies, and social behaviour. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2010
Study the biological, cognitive, moral, emotional, and social changes that occur in an individual during the human lifespan. Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOWK1010
Study the history of social work and its evolution as a profession as the foundation for understanding social work’s current roles and practices. Learn about social policy, political structures, social issues, and practice with diverse client groups.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Therapeutic Recreation

CourseTitleCredit
ANPH1000
Study the basics of normal anatomy and physiology. The structure and function of each body system is covered, and the relationship between the structure and function of each system is explored. Learn about the interactions of body systems.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM2011
Explore the importance of communication skills in developing caring relationships with clients and working effectively within the health-care team. Learn to vary your communication techniques and methods in different situations. Explore various concepts and principles of therapeutic communication and consider their implications for professional practice. Transfer: AU
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
DEMC1011
This is a creative and dynamic approach to dementia care that is suitable for caregivers, both formal and informal, in a variety of care settings. Comprehensive information about dementia from diagnosis to end stage is discussed in a practical and interactive manner.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PATH1010
This course focuses on the pathological processes underlying diseases and disorders. It gives learners a foundation for understanding the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function across the lifespan. The course includes common disease entities as examples of pathological processes. Each pathological process is explained as a concept and illustrated by typical diseases and disorders. Disease is discussed in terms of manifestations, etiology, and complications. Learners will gain a basic understanding of the diagnosis and management of the disease process associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
RHAB1001
Learn the fundamental concepts and theories specific to rehabilitation and gain an introduction to the field of rehabilitation medicine. Examine the common practices and unique roles of physical therapy, therapeutic recreation, and occupational therapy, and explore the skills, roles, and traits of the therapy assistant.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WELL1000
Further your understanding of the field of therapeutic recreation and learn about the models of care in the therapeutic recreation process that guide service delivery. Discuss the Leisure Ability Model as a framework to service, with a focus on promoting a client’s wellness through goal-oriented leisure activities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

University Transfer Courses

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMM1011
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others. Learn theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict, and conflict management.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL1011
This course introduces students to formal and rhetorical writing practices at the post-secondary level, with an emphasis on literary analysis and close reading. Instruction and practice will be integrated with the study of literature drawn from a broad range of historical periods, cultural perspectives, social contexts, and literary genres (including fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction articles and essays, news media, and other cultural texts). Specific themes and texts will vary between sections.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2510
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
ENGL2550
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HEED1000
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
POLS1010
This course explores the development of Canadian political institutions and political issues in Canada.  The student will learn about contemporary Canadian politics by examining the evolution of federalism, the Constitution, parliament, Aboriginal and minority rights, the welfare state, multiculturalism, and similar topics.  The course focuses on teaching critical thinking and writing skills by testing normative and empirical theories against Canadian historical and contemporary evidence.  Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1040
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1050
Build on your introductory knowledge of the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. Focus on the study of cognition (thinking), intelligence and creativity, motivation and emotion, personality, health, stress, and coping, psychological disorders, therapies, and social behaviour. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC1060
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2010
Study the biological, cognitive, moral, emotional, and social changes that occur in an individual during the human lifespan. Transfer: UC
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
PSYC2450
Acquire an overview of the common psychiatric conditions and their symptoms, causes, and treatment modalities. The role of the mental health worker as part of the multidisciplinary team working with clients with mental health disorders is addressed. You will discuss attitudes, stigma, and the influences of culture. Class readings, web-based learning, group discussions, and assignments help illustrate this material.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI1000
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
SOCI2373
This course examines the experience of dying and death through various socio-cultural contexts. Students will be exposed to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of death and dying.  Questions relating to life and living as well as dying and death will be explored and addressed. The course highlights the importance of paying attention to the experience of dying and death that is common to all species and every culture.  It exposes students to the reality of dying and death that is often denied in North American culture today.  The course also seeks to demystify death by allowing students to see it as a common human experience thereby equipping students with the knowledge and skills necessary to begin to deal with dying, death, bereavement, and grief. Students will focus on the topics of aging, the dying process, death, bereavement, and grief as they relate to individuals and caregivers. Current North American practices regarding death will be explored, as well as cross-cultural interpretations of dying, death, and bereavement. The course also addresses ethical issues related to dying and death in contemporary North American institutions and communities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
WMST2010
This course is a critical feminist examination of embodied lives in differing social locations. The course challenges the traditional dichotomies of mind/body, culture/nature, and public/private in the treatment of such topics as the feminization of poverty; sexualities, reproduction, and family life; violence against women; women and religion; masculinities; and culture and body image.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3

Veterinary Office Assistant

CourseTitleCredit
COMM1001
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
COMP1006
Develop foundational computer skills and become proficient using Windows, as well as word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications to enhance your computer skills and employability.
  • 30 Lecture
  • 15 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
3
HLTH1013
Study the language of veterinary terminology. Learn how to read and interpret commonly used veterinary medical terms, symbols, and abbreviations. Develop your understanding of small and large animal anatomy and basic animal pathology. Become familiar with frequently prescribed medications and their uses. Achieve fluency through practice sessions, quizzes, and exercises.
  • 60 Lecture
  • 30 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
6