PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

STARTLOCATIONDELIVERYSTATUS
SepEdmontonIn person
Open
Limited
Waitlist
Full
Upcoming
 
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QUICK FACTS

Program length  

5 or 6 terms

Credential

Diploma

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TUITION & FEES


Canadian
Total: $13,526.00

International
Total: $30,653.00

 
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ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

  • Language Arts – this requirement can be met with any of the following, or an equivalent course:
    • 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2
    • 60% in ESLG 1860 or 70% in ESLG 1898
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Course Listing

You must complete 21 courses to graduate. Courses are listed by term to show the recommended path to completing the program in two years as a full-time student.

Course CodeTitleCredit
Term 1 - 16 weeks
JUST1101 (O)
This course introduces students to the Canadian criminal justice system, its foundations, and the principles that govern it. Students will explore how the police, courts, and correctional system work together to establish and maintain safe communities; they will also learn that not all citizens benefit from the policies and practices of the criminal justice system. In addition, the course will consider the impact of the criminal justice system on Indigenous communities, newcomers to Canada, and other historically and currently marginalized populations. Students will examine key concepts such as police use of power, the over-incarceration of Indigenous people and people of colour, reforms within the justice system, and other topics.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
COMM1001 (O)
Explore the fundamentals of communication and interpersonal relationships. Examine effective communication, barriers to effective communication, and specific communication strategies that can improve interactions with others and enhance critical thinking skills. Learn and apply theories related to communication climate, groups, teams, conflict management, and problem solving.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENGL2510 (O)
This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in professional contexts. Students will learn to produce documents reflecting different types and styles of technical communication, including technical descriptions, proposals, reports, online documents, and instruction manuals. Students will also learn to organize information, write clearly and concisely, rigorously edit their work, cite sources appropriately, and apply APA formatting to a variety of documents. In addition, students will examine effective document design and the use of visual aids, and will be required to create and deliver presentations based on these principles. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
SOCI1000 (O)
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
PSYC1060 (O)
This course introduces the scientific study of behaviour and human development. You will learn terminology and theoretical concepts common to psychology. You will learn about the dominant theories in psychology today and the scientific process. You will also learn about human development across the lifespan; processes of the mind including consciousness, learning, and memory, cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation; and social behaviour. The concepts of stress and health and psychological health and illness are introduced.  Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 2 - 16 weeks
JUST1102 (O)
This course introduces students to the major concepts and themes that emerge in a critical examination of diversity and Canada's settler-colonial criminal justice system. As well as engaging in discussions about race and ethnicity, students will consider other aspects of intersectional diversity such as gender, sexual orientation, age, (dis)ability, and religion. This course will also foreground the diversity of Indigenous peoples in Canada. In addition, students will examine the social, political, and legal contextualization of theories of diversity and their relevance to justice studies. Finally, students will have the opportunity to consider how this theorization applies to practical scenarios that arise within the justice profession.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
HEED1000 (O)
Gain an overview of the physical, social, psychological, environmental, and spiritual aspects of personal health and wellness within the context of the community, the Canadian health-care system, and the global environment. Lifestyle choices are introduced as physical and social determinants affecting personal health and the health of others. Learn how to take responsibility for your own health and to advocate for the health of others.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ENGL2550 (O)
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
SOCI2025 (O)
This course introduces students to the sociological study of crime through theoretical and practical analyses, including the examination and attempted explanation of crime, crime patterns, social processes leading to criminal behaviour, and responses to crime.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Elective3
Term 2 - Electives
WMST2010 (O)
This course is a critical feminist examination of embodied lives in differing social locations. The course challenges the traditional dichotomies of mind/body, culture/nature, and public/private in the treatment of such topics as the feminization of poverty; sexualities, reproduction, and family life; violence against women; women and religion; masculinities; and culture and body image.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
PSYC2450 (O)
Acquire an overview of common psychological disorders and their symptoms, causes, and treatments. The role of the mental health worker as part of a multidisciplinary team working with clients with mental health disorders is addressed. You will discuss attitudes, stigma, and the influences of culture. Class readings, web-based learning, group discussions, and assignments help illustrate this material.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
POLS1000 (O)
Designed to present a critical overview of the major concepts and themes in political science, this course introduces the major subfields, including Canadian politics, political theory, international relations, comparative politics, and gender and politics. It addresses many traditional subjects of the field, such as power relations, theories of the state and democracy, international institutions, evolving conceptualizations of citizenship, and political economy. The course further examines critical questions surrounding colonialism and race relations, the politics of poverty and inequity, and the role of the media in political controversies.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 3 - 8 weeks
Elective3
Term 3 - Electives
INST1000 (O)
Indigenous Studies I (the prerequisite course to Indigenous Studies II) explores the culture, identity, and history of Indigenous Canadians. This course examines the Indian Act of 1867, the language used by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people when describing one another, the numbered treaties of Canada, and contemporary issues, including the fiduciary obligations of the Canadian government toward Indigenous peoples and the co-existence of Indigenous and settler communities and cultures.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST1103
This course offers students an opportunity to better understand the full spectrum of mental health issues and the relationship between mental health and addiction. Students will explore theories, policies, methods, awareness, stigma, and evidence-based strategies to promote mental health and well-being. Through a process of self-reflection, students will develop a professional approach to mental health and addictions that addresses the needs of a diverse Canadian society.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST1104
This course examines gender and sexuality in the context of society and the law. It analyses the concepts and histories of patriarchy, criminalization, racism, and sociological approaches to gender and sexuality. Students will explore intersectional identities of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, (dis)ability, and class, as well as their social and legal evolution. Students will be exposed to indigenous and/or multicultural knowledges and perspectives on gender and sexuality, with particular attention to their intersections with the law.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 4 - 16 weeks
JUST2103
This course provides students with the theoretical foundation and practical skills necessary to intervene in various crisis situations commonly encountered while working in the justice field. By learning about the factors that contribute to creating crises, students will develop effective assessment and intervention strategies with particular emphasis on prevention. Students will explore crisis counselling techniques from a trauma-informed perspective and learn to conduct interviews, provide support, and offer appropriate referrals for those experiencing a crisis. Students will also learn techniques to prioritize their own self-care and safety while working within the multidisciplinary fields of the justice system.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2102
This course explores the fundamental principles that inform traditional Indigenous North American justice systems and how these principles compare to values underpinning the settler-colonial Canadian justice system. Students will consider how incorporating traditional Indigenous practices into Canada's justice system reflects that Canada is a multi-juridical nation. Students will also explore the challenges and resistances that arise in this work.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Elective3
Elective3
Elective3
Term 4 - Electives
JUST2101
The course offers an analysis of Canadian criminal procedures, including arrest, detention, interrogation, and warrants. Students will examine the criminal justice system, with a particular focus on pre-trial and trial processes as conducted by police agencies, legal professionals, and institutions.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2104
This course examines the legal history of commercial sex work in Canada, the sex industry (including workers and purchasers), theories about sex work and its impact on society, legal approaches to sex work in other countries, current legal frameworks regarding sex work in Canada, and sex work as related to criminal law, municipal law, and immigration. Students will explore how sex work is informed by colonialism, race, ethnicity, and class, and will be exposed to Indigenous and/or multicultural perspectives on the sex industry. Additional topics will include sex trafficking and online sex work.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2105
This course explores key aspects of crime in a youth context. Students will investigate the evolution of Canadian law relevant to youth. The course also offers an overview of current and historical theories of youth crime and will focus on a detailed analysis of the Youth Criminal Justice Act, among other legislation. Students will explore the role of the police, courts, correctional agencies, and the community in working with crime-involved youth.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2106
This course examines correctional systems in Canadian society, including the history of corrections, the role of corrections in contemporary society, and the interrelationship between the various correctional components (including community-based corrections, correctional institutions, and parole). Emphasis will be placed on the formal and informal relationships that exist in correctional organizations and the relationships between staff and inmates in correctional facilities.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2107
This course offers an introduction to the history and development of law enforcement in Canada. Students will learn to identify the basic social principles that underlie current law enforcement issues. They will also explore topics including the history of policing, police structure, community policing, current trends in policing, and operational and occupational issues facing police services. In addition, students will examine the interactions of Indigenous persons and communities with Canadian policing.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2108
This course explores the legal status of refugees, illegal immigrants, and asylum seekers within the Canadian justice system. Students will discuss migration patterns and the histories of migration, as well as the difference between "legal" and "illegal" immigration. They will also explore local and national agencies and interest groups that engage with refugees and migrants. Students will focus on how racism, theories of cultural identity, immigration policies, and human rights laws intersect with the lived experiences of refugees and immigrants. The course culminates in an examination of how borders and boundaries are constructed and comprehended in an increasingly globalized world.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2109
This course introduces students to the basic skills and self-awareness necessary to be effective as a counsellor in individual and group settings across the justice system. Through the use of experiential learning, students will develop competency in client engagement and group facilitation, specifically covering topics such as the counselling relationship, listening, the change process, the use of self-disclosure, empathy, questioning, problem solving, treatment, and group dynamics. This course is essential for students who will be interviewing, counselling, and facilitating group work in a variety of justice contexts.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 5 - 16 weeks
JUST2201
This course sets out criminal law as a form of public law and discusses the various elements of a crime, as well as exploring the classification of crimes and the defences available to the accused. Students will consider in detail defences such as mental impairment, provocation, and necessity, as well as consider mitigating considerations such as the Gladue factors, which are considered if the offender comes from the Indigenous community. Students will assess the facts of a criminal matter against the provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Constitution of Canada.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2203
This course examines the professional, ethical responsibilities of law enforcement officers and evaluates the need for codes of conduct in the various agencies of law enforcement. Students will examine the relationship between law enforcement agencies and systemically vulnerable populations, with a focus on law enforcement agency behaviour and decision making. Students will develop an awareness of the attempts being made to build ethical, antiracist relationships between law enforcement agencies and communities across Canada, with a focus on Indigenous communities. The course also examines how law enforcement agencies are striving to diversify their hiring and recruitment practices.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Elective3
Elective3
Elective3
Term 5 - Electives
JUST2202
In this course, students will explore the concept of justice within an Indigenous context. Students will have the opportunity to critically examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous peoples of Canada in relation to law enforcement, law and legislation, corrections, the court system, community involvement, and theories about the overrepresentation of Indigenous people involved with the justice system. Indigenous worldviews will be examined, along with the role of protocol and ceremony in decision making. Indigenous governance and traditional dispute resolution forms and strategies will be explored in the contexts of healing and reconciliation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2204
This course provides students with specific skills and strategies for working with youth, including intervention strategies and the fundamental principles of trauma-informed practice. Students will explore how to emphasize their youth clients' strengths and reinforce pro-social behaviour. They will examine programming in numerous youth justice settings and will also explore the legacy of the residential school system now being enacted within Canada’s child welfare system.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2205
This course provides students with a foundation for practice in working with youth. Students will consider ethical practice, codes of conduct, and the role of the youth worker in light of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and other human rights legislation. Students will focus on various contexts and scenarios related to youth-work practice and examine the scope of a youth justice worker with an emphasis on professionalism, discretion, and problem-solving skills. Students will also evaluate work-related stressors and effective self-care techniques.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2206
This course examines general aspects of Canadian case law and legislation as they apply to the field of corrections and, in particular, the legislative acts and regulations specific to corrections. Students will consider the role of correctional staff in light of specific legislation, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Criminal Code, the Alberta Corrections Act, the federal Corrections and Conditional Release Act, and others. Topics will include the relationship between sentencing and corrections, inmate and victim rights, how legislation and case law govern the role of the corrections officer, and how case law has addressed systemic problems such as the overrepresentation of Indigenous offenders in the correctional setting.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2207
This course will provide a detailed review of the role of a correctional officer within a correctional institution environment. Topics will include current correctional methods with respect to operations, management, and programming. Security procedures, offender management skills, health care in an institutionalized setting, and correctional ethics will be studied and, where appropriate, practical applications will be addressed. This course will also consider overrepresented inmate populations, including Indigenous offenders.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2208
This course introduces the concept of evidence in the Canadian criminal context, including evidence gathering by police and the use of evidence in the courtroom. Students will learn what evidence is, how and why courts and legislatures have developed rules about its use in trials, and how these rules have impacted the manner in which police can collect evidence. In particular, students will learn about how the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms limits police powers in all aspects of the evidence-gathering process, including in searches, surveillance, interrogations, and undercover operations.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2209
This course will provide students with an overview of criminal investigations, with a focus on basic investigative processes, structures, and responsibilities. Topics will include investigative methods and techniques, obtaining and assessing information, crime scene management and analysis, and relevant case studies.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Optional Term 6
JUST2300
In this competitive-entry class, students will be paired with a justice-related organization in Edmonton or the surrounding area. Students will use the skills they have learned throughout their diploma program to contribute to a professional work environment and expand their knowledge of justice-related careers.
  • 0 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 150 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3

Additional note

Courses marked with (O) are available through Open Studies.

​Credits required for full-time status: 9 credits per term