PROGRAM AT A GLANCE

STARTLOCATIONDELIVERYSTATUS
SepEdmontonIn person
Open
Limited
Waitlist
Full
Upcoming
 
More details

QUICK FACTS

Program length  

4 terms

Credential

Diploma

More details

TUITION & FEES


Canadian
Total: $14,248.50

International
Total: $35,842.50

 
More details

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

  • Language Arts – this requirement can be met with any of the following, or an equivalent course:
    • 65 % in English Language Arts 30-1 or 75% in English Language Arts 30-2
    • 65% in ESLG 1860 or 75% in ESLG 1898
More details

Course Listing

You must complete 21 courses to graduate. Courses are listed by term to show the recommended path to completing the program in two years as a full-time student.
Course CodeTitleCredit
Term 1 - 16 weeks
ENGL2550 (O)
The course has a strong focus on essay composition and analysis. The assignments are designed to encourage critical and analytical reading, thinking, and writing. This course also introduces and demonstrates the APA method of citation. Prerequisites: 60% in English Language Arts 30-1 or 70% in English Language Arts 30-2 or equivalent.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1000 (O)
Indigenous Studies I (the prerequisite course to Indigenous Studies II) explores the culture, identity, and history of Indigenous Canadians. This course examines the Indian Act of 1867, the language used by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people when describing one another, the numbered treaties of Canada, and contemporary issues, including the fiduciary obligations of the Canadian government toward Indigenous peoples and the co-existence of Indigenous and settler communities and cultures.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1003 (O)
Indigenous Ways of Knowing and Being introduces students to Indigenous approaches for acquiring, holding, embodying, and passing on knowledge. The course invites students to critically examine and enhance their engagement with Elders/Knowledge Keepers, others, themselves, and the land, and to explore their own connections and responsibilities within this web. Classes take place in the ceremonial space at the Indigenous Students’ Centre, where the circle setting helps facilitate active listening, personal reflection, and group discussions. Students will develop a foundational awareness of culturally appropriate approaches to seeking guidance, following protocols, respecting boundaries, and giving thanks.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1220 (O)
This course is an introductory survey of settler colonial policies affecting Indigenous peoples in Canada as well as Indigenous efforts to confront these policies. Students will learn about the historical relationships, colonial contexts, and social, economic, political, and cultural patterns that have shaped the contemporary experience of Indigenous peoples in Canada. The course focuses on teaching critical-thinking and writing skills by exploring the impacts of colonization on Indigenous peoples and looking at paths toward decolonization and Indigenous resurgence and self-determination.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
ANTH1000 (O)
This course general introduction to anthropology presents central concepts and key issues in the four main subfields—archaeology and biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology. Topics include evolutionary theory, human evolution and diversity, culture change, social organization, and symbolic systems. Students will explore broadly the question of what it means to be human.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 2 - 16 weeks
ENGL1039 (O)
This course will examine a broad range of written and oral forms of storytelling by First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples, with a focus on Canadian writers, stories, and history. Beginning with the historical contexts of storying Indigenous lives and moving through to current time, students will engage with a variety of Indigenous cultural productions including novels, short fiction, poems, plays, orature, spoken word, podcasts, films, and critical theory. Issues of racialization and colonialism, trauma and shame, authenticity, relationship to the land, diaspora, and love and sexuality will be examined, always with an eye to the ways in which storytelling has been used as a means to share, support, and produce cultural and community resilience.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST2000 (O)
Indigenous Studies II provides a detailed examination of the present-day issues and circumstances of Indigenous Canadians with a focus on the Residential School system, the Sixties scoop, Inuit relocation, "authenticity", and stereotypes.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1002 (O)
This course is the only post-secondary course offering in the Treaty 6 area that focuses exclusively on the history and present-day issues of Inuit Canadians. The topic of Inuit Canadians is often omitted in post-secondary programs, and this course brings forward this silenced population of at least 65,025 people. The history of Inuit Canadians is explored through the Eskimo Identification Canada system, the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement, Inuit traditional systems of naming, and the present-day issues of Inuit Canadians, and brings to light the complexities of southern-based urban Inuit life.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
SOCI1000 (O)
Explore introductory sociology through the study of social relations, community, and society. Learn about the institutions of Canadian society, such as family, politics, ethnicity, education, and religion.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Elective3
Term 2 - Electives
INST1152 (O)
This course is an introduction to Plains Cree (Y dialect) grammar and vocabulary, with practice in speaking. No prior Cree knowledge is required. This course is open to non-Cree speakers only.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1260 (O)
This three-credit course introduces students to Indigenous art and cultural objects from pre-contact through contemporary artistic practice. Employing post-modern, feminist, and post-colonial scholarship, students will discover how contemporary art historical study is reframing our previous understanding of Indigenous arts and cultural practices. This course acquaints students with the practice of critical looking and introduces scholarly strategies for interpreting the material aesthetics and cultural history of Indigenous artworks. Students will use their writing skills to develop argumentative analyses of artworks and incorporate an expanded academic vocabulary in their assignments.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 3 - 8 weeks
INST1001
Land-based learning is education that takes place outside, on the land. It acknowledges the importance of the land to Indigenous peoples and to Indigenous teachings, and offers the opportunity to learn based on Indigenous environmental knowledge.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 4 - 16 weeks
PSYC1040 (O)
This course is the basic foundation course in psychology. It provides an introduction to the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. This course examines the evolution of psychology, research methods, descriptive statistics, the brain and behaviour, human lifespan development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, and memory. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST2003 (O)
This Level 2 course will build upon foundations from INST 2000, introducing students to critical race theory, which will be examined using an Indigenous Canadian lens.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1376 (O)
This course explores holistic health-promotion strategies of resilience that interweave Indigenous history, culture, and spirit. There are profound gaps in health for Indigenous peoples for almost every indicator in mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual health, and these are exacerbated by social issues such as systemic racism, poverty, and intergenerational trauma. The reconciliation of present-day health disparities involves rethinking and implementing changes in current health fields and practices. Students will engage with Indigenous ways of teaching, learning, and knowing, including narrative as a form of therapeutic practice.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Elective3
Elective3
Term 4 - Electives
JUST2202
In this course, students will explore the concept of justice within an Indigenous context. Students will have the opportunity to critically examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Indigenous peoples of Canada in relation to law enforcement, law and legislation, corrections, the court system, community involvement, and theories about the overrepresentation of Indigenous people involved with the justice system. Indigenous worldviews will be examined, along with the role of protocol and ceremony in decision making. Indigenous governance and traditional dispute resolution forms and strategies will be explored in the contexts of healing and reconciliation.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1330 (O)
This course is a linear introduction to the history of and a current overview of Indigenous business and economics in Canada. Learners will explore pre-contact and early trade relations between Indigenous peoples and Europeans, as well as look at the effects of trade and economics by colonial policy control and examine the post-colonial resurgence of Indigenous trade, business, and economic development today.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1302 (O)
This course focuses on traditional and contemporary Indigenous approaches to social work practice. Students will be introduced to Indigenous worldviews, teachings, language, and ceremony, predominately from a nehiyaw (Cree) perspective. They will gain knowledge of Indigenous pre-contact and post-contact life, with emphasis on oppressive social policies, the contemporary impacts of colonialism, and the role of social work. Initiatives and strategies that are being undertaken to strengthen and maintain Indigenous culture, language, and way of life will be explored. These concepts will be applied within the context of social work theory and practice.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST2220 (O)
This course explores contemporary Canadian social policy surrounding Indigenous peoples. Building on INST 1000 and INST 2000, it will examine the relationship between the contemporary social, health, and economic conditions of Indigenous peoples and their inclusion in Canadian public and social policy.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2104
This course examines the legal history of commercial sex work in Canada, the sex industry (including workers and purchasers), theories about sex work and its impact on society, legal approaches to sex work in other countries, current legal frameworks regarding sex work in Canada, and sex work as related to criminal law, municipal law, and immigration. Students will explore how sex work is informed by colonialism, race, ethnicity, and class, and will be exposed to Indigenous and/or multicultural perspectives on the sex industry. Additional topics will include sex trafficking and online sex work.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 5 - 16 weeks
WMST2010 (O)
This course is a critical feminist examination of embodied lives in differing social locations. The course challenges the traditional dichotomies of mind/body, culture/nature, and public/private in the treatment of such topics as the feminization of poverty; sexualities, reproduction, and family life; violence against women; women and religion; masculinities; and culture and body image.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
PSYC1050 (O)
Build on your introductory knowledge of the scientific study of behaviour and the mind. Focus on the study of cognition (thinking), intelligence and creativity, motivation and emotion, personality, health, stress, and coping, psychological disorders, therapies, and social behaviour. Note: Students with credit in another introductory psychology course may not be eligible for credit in this course. Please check with the Program Chair.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST2500 (O)
This course looks at Indigenous rights in an international context. Learners will examine a few specific Indigenous groups across the globe and highlight their similar struggles, which may include cultural genocide, land rights, traditional economies, and political systems. This course will present some of the global efforts underway to recognize Indigenous rights internationally.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Elective3
Elective3
Term 5 - Electives
JUST2102
This course explores the fundamental principles that inform traditional Indigenous North American justice systems and how those principles compare to values underpinning the traditional Canadian justice system. As the similarities and differences between the two systems are established, focus shifts to the evolution of both Indigenous and Canadian systems. With the backdrop of system evolution, students will consider the diverse challenges of incorporating traditional Indigenous processes into the justice system, as well as the opportunities this presents for reconciliation and sharing.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1152 (O)
This course is an introduction to Plains Cree (Y dialect) grammar and vocabulary, with practice in speaking. No prior Cree knowledge is required. This course is open to non-Cree speakers only.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1260 (O)
This three-credit course introduces students to Indigenous art and cultural objects from pre-contact through contemporary artistic practice. Employing post-modern, feminist, and post-colonial scholarship, students will discover how contemporary art historical study is reframing our previous understanding of Indigenous arts and cultural practices. This course acquaints students with the practice of critical looking and introduces scholarly strategies for interpreting the material aesthetics and cultural history of Indigenous artworks. Students will use their writing skills to develop argumentative analyses of artworks and incorporate an expanded academic vocabulary in their assignments.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST1435 (O)
Canadian Indigenous peoples are likely to be the first and most severely affected by climate change because of their dependence upon, and close relationship with, the environment. Concerns about land suitability, local food economies, and safe travel mean that Canadian Indigenous peoples face serious challenges now and in the future. This course looks at the role Indigenous peoples play in several Canadian ecosystems and how they are responding to climate change in creative ways, strengthening the resilience of their environment.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
JUST2103
This course provides students with the theoretical foundation and practical skills necessary to intervene in various crisis situations commonly encountered while working in the justice field. By learning about the factors that contribute to creating crises, students will develop effective assessment and intervention strategies with particular emphasis on prevention. Students will explore crisis counselling techniques from a trauma-informed perspective and learn to conduct interviews, provide support, and offer appropriate referrals for those experiencing a crisis. Students will also learn techniques to prioritize their own self-care and safety while working within the multidisciplinary fields of the justice system.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
INST2800 (O)
This course introduces students to the history of Indian Residential Schools (IRS) and the various theoretical concepts and litigation involved in the implementation and dismantling of Indian Residential Schools within Canada. The machine that became Indian Residential Schools is viewed through legislative documents and one IRS survivor’s stories.
  • 45 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 0 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3
Term 6 - optional
INST2001
This optional course, available only in Term 6, sees students gaining community experience while being part of the planning and implementation of a significant Indigenous-focused event, either on campus or in the community. Available activities and community actions may change from year to year. Contact CAEINST@norquest.ca for permission to enroll.
  • 15 Lecture
  • 0 Lab
  • 90 Work Experience
  • 0 Other
3

Additional note

Courses marked with (O) are available through Open Studies.

​Credits required for full-time status: 9 credits per term